A World of PossibilitiesAuthor: A World of Possibilities
21 Jan 2017

A World of Possibilities

A World of Possibilities is an award-winning one hour weekly radio program that penetrates behind the headlines to uncover the deeper meanings of events. It offers in-depth analysis, informed commentary and an exploration of new approaches to our most challenging problems. Our aim is to open minds and inspire new possibilities.

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    The Promise and Perils of Nanotechnology

    Today, nano particles are in our food, cosmetics, and hundreds of other items. And this is just the beginning of what is projected to be a $1 trillion nanotech industry within a decade.  Yet its presence and perils are only on the radar screens of a handful of environmental activists. To date, the U.S. has established no regulations on the development or proliferation of nano particles -- and the European Union is just starting to examine the issue.This hour we’ll hear from four experts who will spell it out for us, starting with the one question on all of our minds: What is Nano-technology?

  • Posted on 20 Dec 2011

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    Fractivists: Slowing the Gas Rush

    In the past few years, natural gas fracking has become a near-household word as landowners in the path of drilling have mounted efforts to slow its rapid pace of development in the U.S. and worldwide. We continue our coverage of this crucial issue with a program about citizen efforts across partisan lines to raise questions about the downsides of fracking and promote what they consider to be cleaner, greener alternatives.

  • Posted on 15 Nov 2011

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    Ruin and Resilience in Northern Uganda

    War has shaped the lives of people in northern Uganda for the past two decades.  Impunity for widespread crimes and grave violations committed during the war is pervasive, and there has been very little victim/community input into top-down plans to implement justice and accountability. Yet sustained peace depends on recreating communal solidarity, building advocacy networks, giving rape survivors, ex-child soldiers and orphans a voice and enabling them to be agents of recovery. For the last few years, researchers with the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University have been documenting what war-affected communities are doing themselves to acknowledge the violations and move forward as a community --using photography, story-telling, chanting, dancing, songs, theatre, and writing. What do communities themselves do to rebuild their lives? These communities have much to teach us about accountability, remedy, and addressing the effects of grave violations that for many will play out over a lifetime. We’ll hear from those who have been actively involved in helping communities heal from decades of mass atrocities in northern Uganda.

  • Posted on 25 Oct 2011

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    911 + Ten: From Unity to Enmity

    Journalist Laurie Garrett was there, in the streets with her notepad and her camera just minutes after the World Trade Center came under attack on September 11th, 2001. She’s written a new book -- a ten-year effort -- called I Heard The Siren's Scream. This hour she’ll share with us her recollections of the 911 attack and what it meant for New Yorkers and for all of us...how it still shapes our relationships to each other as Americans.

  • Posted on 13 Sep 2011

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    Conversations With the Earth

    Global climate change is here. And only now, as our nation is ravaged by hurricanes, floods and droughts, is this new reality becoming all too obvious.  But indigenous people in isolated communities around the world have been sounding the alarm for decades.  This week we’ll meet indigenous messengers from Alaska and Peru who say it’s not too late to use traditional knowledge to reconnect with Mother Earth.  And we’ll learn about a powerful new exhibition at the National Museum of the American Indian launched to amplify their message to the world.

  • Posted on 30 Aug 2011

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