Marketplace TechAuthor: Marketplace
22 Oct 2020

Marketplace Tech

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Hosted by Molly Wood, “Marketplace Tech” demystifies the digital economy. The daily radio show and podcast uncovers how tech influences our lives in unexpected ways and provides context for listeners who care about the impact of tech, business and the digital world. Transforming breaking news to breaking ideas, Marketplace Tech uncovers themes that transcend the hype in an industry that’s constantly changing. Reporting from Oakland, California host Molly Wood asks smart questions that connect the dots and provide insight on the impact of technology to help listeners understand the business behind the technology rewiring our lives. Molly has spent two decades covering the tech industry on all platforms and is known as a pioneer in podcasting. She is an IDEAS contributor at Wired and  has been recognized for her dynamic reporting by the Webbys, the National Magazine Awards, and is a Gracie Award winner. Prior to joining Marketplace, she was a tech columnist at The New York Times and before that an executive editor at CNET. The Marketplace Tech daily news podcast is available worldwide on platforms including Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, RSS Feeds and any place else where you get your podcasts.

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    What happens if online advertising is just a big, fat bubble?

    Big Tech monopolies are in the news this week. The Department of Justice sued Google over how it maintains its search dominance, and its search dominance is the key to its business model, which is that it makes 80% of its revenue from digital advertising. Facebook makes 99% of its revenue from advertising. The profitability of targeted ads is also a big reason why tech companies are constantly collecting so much data about us. And there’s a multibillion-dollar ad tech industry that exists because all of this makes so much money. But what if these ads didn’t work all that well? Molly Wood speaks with Tim Hwang, a former public policy exec at Google, where he worked on artificial intelligence and machine learning. He’s the author of the new book “Subprime Attention Crisis.”


  • Posted on 22 Oct 2020

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    Google is officially on the hot seat with the feds. So now what?

    The Justice Department filed a landmark antitrust lawsuit against Google yesterday over the company’s anticompetitive practices, specifically around search. The Justice Department and 11 states charged Google with maintaining an illegal monopoly on online search through business deals and agreements that lock out competitors, like paying Apple billions of dollars to make Google the default search engine for iPhones, and other deals with browser makers. It’s the most significant case against a Big Tech company in more than 20 years, since the one against Microsoft in 1998. Molly speaks with Charlotte Slaiman, an antitrust attorney at Public Knowledge.


  • Posted on 21 Oct 2020

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    Stitch Fix is betting you’ll buy clothes its way

    Fashion has changed since the COVID-19 outbreak began because what we’re wearing has changed a lot. One company that knows exactly how much is Stitch Fix. It learns your style through a mix of online quizzes and algorithms, and hires stylists who choose clothes specifically for you. You get a box of personalized items — one at a time or as a subscription — and you keep what you want and send back the rest. Behind the scenes, the company’s tech predicts what you and people like you might like, so it’s always updating inventory and its in-house brands. But what happens to a clothing company, even a super techie one, in a pandemic? Molly Wood speaks with Katrina Lake, the founder and CEO of Stitch Fix.


  • Posted on 20 Oct 2020

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    There’s not enough internet for remote learning to go around

    This fall, we’ve been talking every Monday about education and technology during this pandemic, including how access to high-speed internet and devices is just not cutting it across the country. There’s new data on this in our latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll. Thirty percent of parents or guardians with kids learning online and making less than $50,000 say their internet access is inadequate for online school. Marketplace’s Scott Tong reports from rural Virginia on the broadband gap.


  • Posted on 19 Oct 2020

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    5G is finally here — kind of

    Neither elections nor Supreme Court hearings nor social media controversies can stop the autumn announcement of new iPhones. And now, those new iPhones can connect to 5G networks. And you may be asking yourself at this point: What even is the deal with 5G? A survey out this month says nearly half of iPhone users in America believe their devices already connect to 5G — but they don’t. Or they might connect to AT&T’s not-really-5G called 5GE. Molly Wood speaks with Shara Tibken, a senior reporter for CNET.


  • Posted on 16 Oct 2020

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