All Things ConsideredAuthor: BBC Radio Wales
20 Feb 2019

All Things Considered

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Religious affairs programme, tackling the thornier issues of the day in a thought-provoking manner

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    Missionary and mother of 54 (Part 2)

    Roy Jenkins' guest for the second of a two part edition of All Things Considered is Chrissie Chapman, a Christian missionary and midwife who left Dinas Powis in the Vale of Glamorgan for one of the poorest countries on earth - and found both her life's work, and a family. Last week we heard of the challenges she faced 28 years ago when she arrived in the small East African state of Burundi to set up a maternity clinic and dispensary in a remote mountaintop location. She described a life changing encounter with angels and her conviction that her work in the war-ravaged country has been sustained by divine miracles. This week, Chrissie Chapman takes up the story where the civil war (which was to claim 300,000 lives) forced her to abandon the maternity clinic and start working in the camps packed with people displaced by Burundi's ethnic violence, and refugees from the genocide in neighbouring Rwanda. She had already adopted two daughters, she would eventually bring up more than 50 children, and she began by telling Roy Jenkins about the arrival of her adopted son. This programme was first broadcast in June 2018

  • Posted on 17 Feb 2019

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    Missionary and mother of 54 (Part 1)

    Roy Jenkins' guest for the first of a two part edition of All Things Considered is the single mother of three adopted children, who has brought up more than fifty others. She has done it in one of the poorest countries on earth, Burundi - politically unstable, with persistent violence, a refugee crisis, and the legacy of a civil war which took 300,000 lives. A trained midwife, Chrissie Chapman was living in Dinas Powys, in the Vale of Glamorgan, when she became convinced that she should travel to the small East African state on a short-term mission to open a maternity clinic and dispensary. That was 28 years ago. She went on to set up a centre for abandoned babies and traumatised children, and later a schools complex. And her own family grew along the way. She's brought many children into the world and also seen many dying along the way through disease and malnutrition. And she has been close to death herself - given just months to live in her early twenties, and all too familiar with deadly violence in her adopted country. In all this she's convinced that she's been sustained by divine miracles (and on one occasion by a squadron of angels). This programme was first broadcast in June 2018

  • Posted on 10 Feb 2019

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    Homelessness and the Church

    The latest figures on homelessness in Wales will be published this week, at a time when increased numbers of homeless people on the streets have caused both concern and controversy. A Cardiff councillor attracted fury for demanding that the council tear down the tents of rough sleepers in the city centre, insisting that there is adequate safe provision for anyone who needs it: she was suspended by her group, but reinstated after a few days. The cold weather means that the plight of those sleeping outdoors is particularly precarious: all kinds of voluntary groups provide warm clothing and hot food - and sometimes places to sleep. And churches often act together to make a significant contribution. But it’s not a straightforward situation: what needs to be done? Why do faith communities feel a particular responsibility? And how should we react as individuals to the people we may pass every day? Joining Roy Jenkins to discuss this are: Yvonne Connolly, Area Manager for the Salvation Army's Homelessness Services Unit for Wales and the South West of England; Sharon Lee, Director of Housing Justice Cymru, a charity advising churches across Wales; and Peter Hall from Gateway Church Centre, whose night shelter provides showers, meals, and daycare to homeless people in Abergavenny.

  • Posted on 03 Feb 2019

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    Nationalism & Religion.

    As the remains of six unknown victims of Auschwitz were buried in Hertfordshire last Sunday - one for every million Jewish people killed by the Nazis - the Chief Rabbi urged an end to rising anti-Semitism. Later in the week, the country’s most senior counter-terrorism officer warned that the ‘febrile’ atmosphere around Brexit could be exploited by far right extremists. At a time of heightened division and the rise of right-wing nationalist movements across Europe, and in other parts of the world, some draw disturbing parallels with the Germany of the 1930s. On Holocaust Memorial Day, Roy Jenkins asks is such talk merely alarmist? Wales has had its own nationalist party for more than 90 years, with elected representatives at Westminster, in Brussels and in the Welsh Assembly. Plaid Cymru is part of the political establishment, hardly sinister - there are clearly important distinctions to be made. So just what is nationalism? And in what ways is it bound up with religion? Joining Roy to discuss the issues are Dan Cohn-Sherbok, ordained Reform Rabbi and Professor Emeritus of Judaism at the University of Wales Trinity St. David; The Rev’d Aled Edwards, Chief Executive of Cytun, Churches Together in Wales, active in issues of equality, racism and the care of refugees and asylum seekers; and Sinisa Malesevic, Professor of Sociology at University College Dublin, who has written and lectured widely on nationalism, ethnicity and identity.

  • Posted on 27 Jan 2019

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