BirdNoteAuthor: Tune In to Nature.org
23 May 2018

BirdNote

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BirdNote strives to transport listeners out of the daily grind and into the natural world with outstanding audio programming and online content. The stories we tell are rich in sound, imagery, and information, connecting the ways and needs of birds to the lives of listeners. We inspire people to listen, look, and exclaim, “Oh, that’s what that is!”

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    Walking to Connect With Nature

    Teenager Asher Millikan came home from Vice President Al Gore’s “climate reality” program inspired to share the story of climate change in her own Denver community. She lead a group of people, young and old, on an exploratory walk through the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Posted on 23 May 2018

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    Northern Saw-whet Owl - A Bird with a Lot to Say

    For such a small owl, the Northern Saw-whet has a lot to say. And a lot of ways to say it. Males weigh about as much as an American Robin. And they send out at least 11 different calls, including “toot-toot-toot” advertising calls, from late January through May.

  • Posted on 22 May 2018

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    The Roost That Saved a Refuge

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge was once where some of the country’s dirtiest weapons were produced, like mustard and sarin gas and napalm. The discovery of roosting Bald Eagles in the 1980s helped change the course of this prairie landscape.

  • Posted on 21 May 2018

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    Lazuli Bunting

    With its beautiful colors, the Lazuli Bunting might just have inspired Navajo artists. In summer, these beautiful singers inhabit the brushy canyons east of the Cascades. And where the Lazuli Bunting sings, you'll often hear the music of Vesper Sparrows and Western Meadowlarks.

  • Posted on 20 May 2018

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    Burrowing Owl

    The Burrowing Owl is most active during the day. It migrates south for the winter and returns each spring to an ever more uncertain fate. The owl is in serious decline, due to intensive agriculture, urban sprawl, destruction of ground squirrel colonies, and elimination of sage habitats.

  • Posted on 19 May 2018

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