BirdNote DailyAuthor: BirdNote
29 Sep 2021

BirdNote Daily

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Escape the daily grind and immerse yourself in the natural world. Rich in imagery, sound, and information, BirdNote inspires you to notice the world around you.

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    Scintillating Starlings

    In Africa, where there are dozens of starling species, a quick look reveals a variety of visual stunners. Some of the names hint at their dazzle: Superb Starling, as well as Golden-breasted, Emerald, Purple, Violet-backed, and Splendid Glossy Starlings. Starlings sparkle because they have special extra structures in their feather cells called melanosomes. Learn more at BirdNote.org.


  • Posted on 28 Sep 2021

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    Migrations: Veeries Predict Hurricanes

    In some years, tawny-colored thrushes called Veeries cut their breeding season short. Researchers discovered that Veeries tend to stop breeding early in the same years that the Atlantic hurricane season is particularly severe. Surprisingly, Veeries are sometimes better at predicting hurricane conditions than computer models! Despite their forecasting prowess, though, Veeries are vulnerable to climate change. Learn more at BirdNote.org.


  • Posted on 27 Sep 2021

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    What Kind of Music Is Bird Song?

    Composers from Vivaldi to Beethoven have been inspired by birdsong. But how similar is birdsong to the music we create? Two recent studies offer contrasting answers. One analysis used nearly 250 song examples of the Nightingale Wren, pictured here, a tropical bird widely admired for its haunting song. It concluded that Nightingale Wren songs only rarely accord with our harmonic intervals. However, analysis of Hermit Thrush songs revealed a harmonic structure that was similar to human music at least 70% of the time.  Learn more at BirdNote.org.


  • Posted on 26 Sep 2021

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    The Cuban Tody

    The Cuban Tody is almost indescribably cute! It’s a "must-see" bird for anyone heading for the West Indies. In woodlands throughout the island of Cuba, todies are terrific foragers. In fact, their Puerto Rican cousins have been known to catch up to one or two insects a minute — hunting from dawn to dusk. Their wings make an audible whirring sound, and you may find a tody just by listening for that sound. Learn more at BirdNote.org.


  • Posted on 25 Sep 2021

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    The Birds of Former Rice Plantations

    Ornithologist Drew Lanham visits a wetland that was once a rice plantation built and farmed by enslaved Black people. After the Civil War, many birds continued to rely on these wetlands. Now, biologists manage water levels in the former rice fields to support shorebirds, ducks, and rare species such as the Black Rail. Learn more at BirdNote.org.


  • Posted on 24 Sep 2021

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