Business DailyAuthor: BBC World Service
14 Nov 2018

Business Daily

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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

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    The Death of Expertise

    Why do so many people think they know best? And are they putting dolts in charge of government? Ed Butler speaks to Professor Tom Nichols of the US Naval War College, himself an expert on national security, who wrote a book on the subject why everyone from surgeons to electricians to academics find themselves under attack from novices and ignoramuses who think their opinions should have equal weight. We also hear from Michael Lewis, whose new book, The Fifth Risk, examines the extent to which President Trump has neglected the US civil service. Is there a risk of something going catastrophically wrong - for example a nuclear waste containment or a natural disaster response - through the sheer inattention and incompetence of the people put in charge. Plus, might the root of the problem be the Dunning-Kruger Effect - a psychological trait whereby the inept are unaware of their own ineptness? We ask Professor David Dunning from the University of Michigan. (Picture: Two-year-old girl plays with carpentry tools; Credit: lisegagne/Getty Images)

  • Posted on 13 Nov 2018

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    The Rise of India’s Billionaires

    Are the super-rich the biggest beneficiaries of India's booming economy? It is one of the world’s fastest growing economies, but it also has some of the worlds most extreme inequality. James Crabtree, author of The Billionaire Raj, tells us about India’s extraordinary explosion of wealth and the addition of almost 100 billionaires since the 1990s. One tycoon even threw an elaborate wedding for his daughter at The Palace of Versailles in France. Rahul Tandon tells the story of one billionaire’s daughter who moved to Scotland to study for a university degree. Her parents hired a cook, driver, maids and butlers to help her settle in. Meanwhile corruption in India continues to thrive. Dr Anand Rai is a campaigner and was a whistle-blower in the Vyapam scandal, where civil service and medical applicants could buy entry into the system, rather than passing tough exams. He isn’t convinced that the current government is serious about passing a key law that would protect whistle-blowers. (Picture: ArcelorMittal steel billionaire Lakshmi Mittal with his wife at a wedding reception; Credit: Rajesh Kashyap/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

  • Posted on 12 Nov 2018

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    Bossy Women and Women Bosses

    Does increasing the number of women on a company's board boost its financial performance? It's a popular narrative, but Manuela Saragosa speaks to Professor Renee B Adams of Said Business School at Oxford University, who claims there is no evidence to support it. And she asks Gay Collins of campaigning group the 30% Club whether it even matters. Plus, how do you tell a male colleague that he's wrong without hurting his feelings? Or interact with a male employee without threatening his ego? Comedian Sarah Cooper has some tongue-in-cheek tips for the aspiring female executive. (Picture: Young businessman being disciplined by female boss; Credit: LukaTDB/Getty Images)

  • Posted on 09 Nov 2018

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    Dating for Money

    As university tuition fees rise and rise, young female students are flocking onto online sugar dating platforms to find wealthy older men who can foot the bill. But where is the line between sugar babies and escorts - or indeed prostitution? Manuela Saragosa speaks to the founder of one such dating platform. Brandon Wade is founder and chief executive of seeking.com, which claims 10 million members worldwide. And she asks Kavita Nayar, who is researching computer-mediated intimacy and erotic labour at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, whether these young women are being exploited, or liberated. (Picture: Young woman with an older man bearing a gift; Credit: Stockbyte/Getty Images)

  • Posted on 08 Nov 2018

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    Bosses, Babies and Breast Pumps

    Engineers showcase new technologies to help women return to work after maternity leave - but why is the engineering profession itself so male-dominated? Jane Wakefield attends a breast pump hackathon at MIT, speaking to businesses venture capitalists and campaigners such as Catherine D'Ignazio from Make The Breast Pump Not Suck. Jane also hears from engineers Emma Booth of Black & Veatch and Isobel Byrne Hill of ARUP about their experiences of returning to a very male-dominated industry after the birth of their own children, and the importance of networks such as The Women's Engineering Society. This programme was first broadcast on 19 July 2018. (Picture: Woman holds up smart breast pumps; Credit: Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Posted on 07 Nov 2018

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