Business DailyAuthor: BBC World Service
16 Aug 2018

Business Daily

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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

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    Trading ancient bones

    Mongolia is a gold-mine for palaeontologists, where thousands of dinosaur skeletons have been unearthed in the Gobi desert. But many of these skeletons have been smuggled out of the country to be sold at auction abroad as trophies for the super rich. Joshua Thorpe reports on how this adversely impacts on the work of palaeontologists and what is being done to repatriate these dinosaur skeletons back to Mongolia. The trade in ivory from woolly mammoths dug up in Siberia is worth billions of dollars and is currently legal. So should it be banned? Iris Ho, senior specialist for Wildlife programmes and policy at the Humane Society in Washington DC, explains how the legality of the mammoth ivory trade enables traders in China to sell banned elephant ivory as mammoth; and Douglas Macmillan, professor of bio diversity at the University of Kent, gives his view on whether a ban on mammoth ivory would be effective. (Image: the skull of a Tyrannosaurus Rex. Credit: Getty Images)

  • Posted on 15 Aug 2018

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    Tackling Africa's Land Rights

    Could the tide by turning for one of the continent's trickiest issues - land rights? In Tunisia, President Essebsi has announced plans to submit a draft bill to parliament that would give women the same inheritance rights as men. Wafa Ben-Hassine, a lawyer and human rights advocate welcomed the news. However, she stressed that for real change to occur, the existing laws need to be implemented effectively. Jenna Di Paolo Colley from the US-based campaign group, Rights and Resources says the inability of local, indigenous populations to defend what's traditionally been theirs is a basic obstacle to development. We hear from one man in Uganda who says a powerful gang has attacked and tried to kill him in order to claim his tribal land. The police officer accused has yet to be tried and is still working, contrary to police guidelines. Chief magistrate Juliet Hatanga explains that the problem in Uganda is getting the law to work for you, especially if you're a poor land-owner. (Picture: A woman holding a basket filled with vegetables she has harvested. Credit: Getty Images)

  • Posted on 14 Aug 2018

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    Wildfires: The Growing Menace

    Europe and the United States have seen a series of devastating fires, with the biggest ever recorded in California and the most lethal in Greece. How can we tackle the issue of forests burning like never before? Ray Rasker from Headwater Economics in Montana has been researching financial and legal responses to US wildfires. Yiannis Baboulias, a journalist in Greece, says the government in his country has created an incentive for people to start fires, by failing to adequately register land titles. Christina Tague, Professor of Hydrology at the University of California Santa Barbara, has been using computer simulation models to try and predict how wildfires will behave and to establish what measures are most effective at tackling the problem. (Picture: A firefighter working on the Medocino Complex fire in California. Credit: Getty)

  • Posted on 13 Aug 2018

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    Has Mining Cleaned Up its Act?

    Mining in the developing world still sparks violent protests - so what has the industry learned? Grace Livingstone reports from the Tintaya copper mine in Peru, owned by mining giant Glencore, where local people are angry over the pollution of waterways, and two protesters have been shot. Why do these things still happen? Vishala Sri-Pathma speaks to Henry Hall of mining consultants Critical Resource. Plus, meet "Dr Copper" - the copper market's reputation as a bellwether for the global economy. But why is the market price falling at a time when the world continues to boom? We ask Charlie Durant of commodities analysts CRU Group. (Picture: Miners take a break at the Cabeza de Negro copper mine in Peru; Credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Posted on 10 Aug 2018

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    Stars, Shirts and Sponsors

    How are elite football clubs able to raise so much money from sponsors and merchandise to spend on the top players? Juventus just paid 100 million euros to buy Cristiano Ronaldo, a player who at 33 years old has only 2-3 years of his peak playing left. Ed Butler asks football finance expert Rob Wilson of Sheffield Hallam University to explain how they get the numbers to add up. Plus Doug Bierton of retailer Classic Football Shirts talks about the fan nostalgia over vintage sponsors, and Nathan Brew, commercial manager at the Llanelli Scarlets explains why the Welsh rugby club decided to make room on their kit for more than 20 sponsors. (Picture: Juventus new signing Cristiano Ronaldo poses with club shirt; Credit: Valerio Pennicino - Juventus FC/Juventus FC via Getty Images)

  • Posted on 09 Aug 2018

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