Capital ReportAuthor: ssafran@npr.org
25 Sep 2017

Capital Report

Download, listen or watch all podcasts

WFSU/Florida Public Radio reporters, as well as reporters from public radio stations across the state, bring you timely news and information from around Florida. Whether it's legislative maneuvers between legislative sessions, the economy, environmental issues, tourism, business or the arts, Capital Report gives information on issues that affect the lives of everyday Floridians. Capital Report is broadcast each Friday at 6:30 pm and 9:00pm ET on 88.9FM - WFSU Tallahassee, 5:30 pm CT on 89.1FM -WFSW Panama City and on public radio stations across the state (check local listings). During Florida Legislative Session: Weekdays 6:30 pm & 9:00 pm ET - 88.9FM WFSU Tallahassee & Weekdays 5:30 pm CT - 89.1FM WFSW Panama City and on public radio stations across the state (check local listings).

  • Listen

    Capital Report: 09-22-2017

    The latest attempt by Congressional Republicans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act could be in trouble now that Arizona Senator John McCain has voiced his opposition publically. Lynn Hatter reports the move comes a day after the Kaiser Family Foundation released an analysis showing Florida’s Medicaid program, which supports low income residents, could lose nearly 10-billion dollars over six years if the measure were to gain passage. Lynne spoke with the foundation’s Policy Analyst Dr. Diane Rowland. Florida Public Radio’s Lynn Hatter speaking with Dr. Diane Rowland, health policy analyst from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Many Floridians have jobs, but still don’t have enough money to pay for health insurance. They often wind up with only one option for primary care, the state’s free and charitable clinics. Health News Florida Editor Julio Ochoa talked with some of those patients. Following the death of 10 seniors living in a Hollywood nursing facility, officials have put an

  • Posted on 23 Sep 2017

    download
  • Listen

    Capital Report: 09-15-2017

    Hurricane Irma proved fatal to eight patients in a Hollywood Hills nursing home, which lost power and air conditioning during the storm. Many more such homes and assisted living facilities statewide also lost power, prompting evacuations and efforts by first responders to make sure those residents who remained in those facilities were safe. From member station WMFE in Orlando, Health News Florida reporter Abe Aboraya takes a look at what’s next for these homes. Even though Hurricane Irma has left Florida, it left behind many neighborhoods several feet under water. From member station WUSF in Tampa, Steve Newborn takes us to one such neighborhood along the Alafia (uh-LAW-fee-uh) River in Hillsborough County. Certainly Hurricane Irma was dangerous and even deadly in many parts of Florida. And as the storm approached the Capital City, there was fear bordering on panic. But the worst never came. In Leon County this week, city and county workers set their usual duties aside to go out and

  • Posted on 18 Sep 2017

    download
  • Listen

    Capital Report: 09-01-2017

    U.S. Education Secretary Betsey DeVos praised Florida’s school choice programs during a Tallahassee visit this week. Her arrival comes as school districts across the state prepare to battle with the legislature over a new law they say will further destabilize traditional public school systems. This year Florida lawmakers changed the way the state building codes are updated. There are concerns the new law could weaken the integrity of Florida homes, in order to cut construction costs. In the wake of Harvey, Kate Payne reports, those concerns are taking on a new significance. The Hollywood city commission has approved a plan to rename three streets named after confederate generals. Nick Evans reports it’s part of a broader effort reassessing the state’s relationship with its history. Florida’s child welfare officials are doing a review of their system and already looking ahead legislatively on the state and national level on what can be done to further help children within the system.

  • Posted on 02 Sep 2017

    download
  • Listen

    Capital Report: 08-25-2017

    This week, the State of Florida executed its first convict in more than a year and a half. Capital punishment had been on hold since a major U.S. Supreme Court ruling found Florida’s execution process was unconstitutional. Now, as we hear from member station WLRN’s Wilson Sayre, more than one-hundred prisoners on death row are working to reduce their sentences. We continue our look at what the future may hold as far as Florida’s death penalty goes. Florida Public Radio’s Nick Evans checked in with Reporter Wilson Sayre after this week’s execution of Mark Asay. Whether they know it or not, Florida taxpayers are funding certain statewide political campaigns. Supporters say the practice promotes diversity at the ballot box. But now the Speaker of the House is taking aim at the system. Kate Payne looks into who is actually benefiting from public financing. A Florida lawmaker is once again pushing to increase computer programming education in schools. Regan McCarthy has more... The memorial

  • Posted on 28 Aug 2017

    download
  • Listen

    Capital Report: 08-18-2018

    Last year, north Florida voters sent two polar opposites, Republican Neal Dunn and Democrat Al Lawson, to represent them in Congress. The wide philosophical and partisan gulf separating the two men – and much of the nation -- was on full display during recent appearances in Tallahassee. Jim Ash has more. It’s been a tough week for the Florida Highway Patrol. Talk of speeding ticket quotas led to the resignation of a Troop Commander. But, as Sascha Cordner reports, the law enforcement agency is now trying to put that behind them, and move forward. Four counties in North Florida are forming what’s known as a freight logistics zone to improve the region’s chances for state infrastructure dollars. Nick Evans reports officials believe it’s an important step toward growing jobs. A little over a month after the Sabal Trail Pipeline went online, Central Florida residents are reporting foul-smelling leaks. Despite the sulfur-like scent, the structure is not emitting natural gas. But Kate Payne

  • Posted on 18 Aug 2017

    download

Follow Playlisto