Cato Event PodcastAuthor: The Cato Institute
13 Nov 2018

Cato Event Podcast

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Podcast of policy and book forums, Capitol Hill briefings and other events from the Cato Institute

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    The Rise of the Superhero President

    “Healer in chief,” national redeemer, father figure, Leader of the Free World — the modern president is required to be all those things and more. It’s a radical — and dangerous — departure from the Founding Fathers’ vision of a chief magistrate with limited powers, charged with faithfully executing the laws. The demands we’ve placed on the office have transformed it into a constitutional monstrosity with powers too vast to entrust to any single, fallible human being. How did we get here? Where does Donald Trump fit into the transformation of the presidency? Can we ever restore the Framers’ modest conception of the office and again limit its powers? A new documentary from We the Internet TV provides provocative answers to these questions. Join us for the premiere screening of The Rise of Trump: Why a Reality Show President Was Inevitable (approximately 15 minutes), followed by a discussion with director Rob Montz and Cato vice president Gene Healy.

  • Posted on 09 Nov 2018

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    Stalin’s Propaganda and Putin’s Information Wars


  • Posted on 03 Nov 2018

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    Coercive Plea Bargaining

    Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy has observed that “criminal justice today is for the most part a system of pleas, not a system of trials.” Although nowhere mentioned in the text of the Constitution, plea bargaining has become the default mechanism for resolving criminal charges in the United States. Indeed, some 95 percent of criminal convictions today are obtained through plea bargains, which raises a number of serious concerns, including why so few people choose to exercise their hallowed and hard-won right to a jury trial. When one considers the many tools available to prosecutors to encourage defendants to accept plea offers, together with the incentive to resolve as many cases as efficiently as possible, one cannot help but ask how many plea agreements are truly voluntary and how many are the result of irresistible coercion. Are there constitutional or ethical limits on coercive plea bargaining, and if so, are they being properly enforced? And what should we make of an institution that has practically eliminated the criminal jury trial and with it the Framers' painstaking efforts to ensure citizen participation in the administration of justice? We will discuss these and other important questions raised by the evolution of plea bargaining within our justice system.

  • Posted on 18 Oct 2018

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    The Hell of Good Intentions: America’s Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S. Primacy

    At the end of the Cold War, the United States was confident that it stood on the precipice of a new era of peace and prosperity as the world’s sole superpower. U.S. leaders adopted a strategy of primacy, aimed at discouraging others from challenging American power, and they sought to spread democracy and liberal economics within an American sphere of influence that encompassed most of the world. Today, relations with Russia and China have deteriorated, nationalist movements are on the rise, and the European Union seems unsteady at best. In his new book, The Hell of Good Intentions, Stephen Walt traces many of these problems to the flaws inherent in primacy. U.S. power has allowed policymakers to pursue ambitious foreign policy goals, even when those goals are unnecessary or doomed to fail. And yet, despite many setbacks, an entrenched foreign policy elite retains its faith in liberal hegemony. Join us at noon on Wednesday, October 17, as Walt explores these ideas and outlines the case for a fresh, new approach to American foreign policy based on realism and restraint.

  • Posted on 17 Oct 2018

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    Parental Leave: Is There a Case for Federal Action?

    Paid family leave has become an issue of national significance, and some policymakers think the federal policy status quo is insufficient. As a result, in 2017 congressional Democrats proposed funding leave through payroll taxes on businesses and workers, and the Trump administration suggested providing paid parental leave through state unemployment insurance. In 2018, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) proposed legislation allowing workers to dip into Social Security retirement benefits to cover paid leave. Please join us for a conversation about paid family leave and current federal proposals for paid leave. Emily Ekins, director of polling at Cato Institute, will provide a first look at new public opinion polling on paid leave. Vanessa Brown Calder, Veronique de Rugy, and Rachel Greszler will discuss their research on paid family leave, with a focus on current federal proposals like the FAMILY Act (the Family and Medical Insurance Leave Act) and Social Security–paid family leave.

  • Posted on 12 Oct 2018

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