CLF QuestAuthor: Church of the Larger Fellowship - Unitarian Universalist
27 Feb 2017

CLF Quest

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Unitarian Universalist sermons, meditations, educational resources and comments from Quest, the monthly publication of the Church of the Larger Fellowship. The CLF is a virtual UU congregation of more than 3,000 Unitarian Universalists isolated by geography or choice. We minister to each other through our presence on the web, small group ministries via email, open conversations on our CLF List, prison pen-pals program, and Quest, which you can hear on this podcast. For more information, or to support our work in the world, call us at (617) 948-6166 or visit us on the web at clfuu.org.

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    CLF Quest January: Transformation

    January: This month our theme is transformation. Our Senior Minister Meg Riley writes about nothing being as transformative as love. Ruth MacKenzie, in the wake of Michael Brownís shooting and subsequent protests in Ferguson, Missouri, canít help but think of my new understanding of hatching. Douglas Taylor wonders if the call to transformation is a call to continue to grow, not because who you are now is not good enough, but rather because who you yet can be is still more amazing! Sufi describes the stream as it raises its vapor into the welcoming arms of the wind, which gently and easily bore it upwards and along, letting it fall softly as rain once they reached the roof of a mountain, many, many miles away, where it then became a river. Grace Lee Boggs observes the America that is best known and most resented around the world pursues unlimited economic growth, technological revolutions, and consumption, with little or no regard for their destructive impact on communities, on the environment, and on the billions of people who live in what used to be called the ìThird World.î Lynn Ungar notices that hildren transform as a matter of course, just by doing what children do. Adults have to try a little harder. Adults aiming for transformation have to choose a course, and decide to make little changes over and over again. It doesnít always happen, but sometimes it does. Quoting Barbara Kingsolver, Lena K. Gardner reminds us that the CLF offers love, resources and support for all of lifeís transformations, both the chosen and the unexpected. CLF's online worship is now accessible on mobile devices. Bill Neely offers poetry from "With or Without Candlelight," a Meditation Anthology

  • Posted on 01 Jan 2015

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    CLF Quest December: Signs and Wonders

    December: This month our theme is signs and wonder. Our Senior Minister Meg Riley describes how we humans depend on signs to stay alive. Victoria Safford notes that our calling is alchemy--to transform wonder into something that endures even after the moment of wonderment passes. Lena K. Gardner refernces Paulo Coelho's words to say, "No one lights a lamp in order to hide it behind the door." Lynn Ungar asks "what do we, who are presumably rational, well-educated people, do with the concept of the miraculous?" Jake Morrill talks about a sign not being the same as a message. Maybe it only comes as a simple reminder. Kari Kopnick describes holly as being a sign there was still hope. Did you know that the CLF Shop offers notecards suitable for holiday greetings? Walt Whitman writes, "In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time, Look'd up in perfect silence at the stars."

  • Posted on 01 Dec 2014

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    CLF Quest November: Home

    November: This month our theme is home. Our Senior Minister Meg Riley wonders what things might look like if we shaped our lives in very particular ways that would help us find out way home each night. CLF Member Haden Conrad, a convicted felon, describes home as a place where his heart is. Billy, a CLF member and prisoner, took two decades to find a real spiritual home through the CLF. CLF's Nominating Committee seeks leaders. Susan Maginn wonders how you know when to become a resident, when to settle in, and when to call it home. CLF Member Christopher Benson finds the word "home" very powerful. It is both unattainable and vital. James Ishmael notes that somewhere in our hearts there is always a knowing of our home, which calls to us in our dreams. Lynn Ungar observes that home-making at its best does answer a particular longing: to be welcomed, to be at ease, to be included. Did you know that the CLF Shop offers gifts suitable for holiday giving? Lynn Ungar writes how it takes a heap of living to make a house a home.

  • Posted on 01 Nov 2014

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    CLF Quest October: Mourning

    October: This month our theme is mourning. Our Senior Minister Meg Riley hopes that the depth of your grief be a measure of your love for those you have lost. Darcey Laine understands that being alive in this mortal world means knowing loss. Roger Bertschausen notes that loss teaches us not to take for granted the sweet things in life. Joanna Macy describes the five principles of despair. CLF Staff hopes you will give $100 to offer comfort and community whenever and wherever there is need. Lynn Ungar wonders what we do, what we say, especially to children, when someone we love is dying or has died. Nancy Shaffer's poem describes how she will make a place for you.

  • Posted on 01 Oct 2014

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    CLF Quest September: Theological Diversity and Common Ground

    September: This month our theme is about theological diversity and common ground. Our Senior Minister Meg Riley describes one of the ways we create spiritual or theolgical common ground is so simple it's almost embarrassing: We agree to do so. Rebecca Ann Parker asks if our religious identity is too diverse without anyone in control. She describes how our sacred circle draws us together in passionate love for life. William Sinkford notes that the words we use to talk about the holy can close more doors than they open. How do we deal, in practical terms, with the religious diversity in this house of Unitarian Universalism? Tandi Rogers says that she is paid to grow our current congregations. "I've been lurking on internet sites of fundamentalist evangelists, because, they have systems for planting new congregations... I have a hot case of holy envy." Janice Marie Johnson describes covenants as being intentional. Covenants are audacious. Covenants are a promist that can change our lives together in this faith. Lynn Ungar admits to some disadvantages to being a UU kid. There are advantages, of course, like being able to celebrate holidays from a variety of different religions, but there are definitely drawbacks. Did you know that the CLF sells colorful posters for RE space or a child's room? Hafiz' poem (c. 1325 - c. 1389) writes that out of a great need we are all holding hands and climbing.

  • Posted on 01 Sep 2014

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