Day1 Weekly Radio Broadcast - Day1 FeedsAuthor: Day1.org
13 Nov 2018

Day1 Weekly Radio Broadcast - Day1 Feeds

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Each week the Day1 program, hosted by Peter Wallace, presents an inspiring message from one of America's most compelling preachers representing the mainline Protestant churches. The interview segments inform you about the speaker and the sermon Scripture text, and share ways you can respond to the message personally in your faith and life.

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    Kelly Hough Rogers: Therefore, Do Not Worry

      I am a lectionary preacher. The lectionary is the prescribed readings for each Sunday in a three-year cycle. It is designed to offer readings with lengths that can be heard comfortably. But I would argue that our reading from the Gospel of Matthew chapter 6, ends a verse short. To me, verse 34 is vital to the hearing and understanding of Jesus' whole message saying, "So do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own. Today's trouble is enough for today." I like this call to take life one day at a time. I like this call, but I may not have always heeded it. I was an anxious adolescent. I worried nonstop. But with the benefit of age and experience, I can see how little worry accomplishes. I love the way that author and activist, Corrie Ten Boom, speaks of worry writing, "Worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow, it empties today of its strength." I think this notion strengthens Jesus' message that worry lessens our faith. Listen to Matthew 6:25-34.   "Therefore, I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air; they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? And can any of you by worrying add a single hour to your span of life? And why do you worry about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not clothed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you - you of little faith? Therefore, do not worry, saying, 'What will we eat?' or 'What will we drink?' or 'What will we wear?' 'For it is the Gentiles who strive for all these things; and indeed, your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. But strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. So, do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own. Today's trouble is enough for today."

  • Posted on 13 Nov 2018

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    Charley Reeb: Why Christianity?

      Do you know why you are a Christian? If someone were to ask you why you follow Jesus rather than the myriad of religions and philosophies in the world, what would you say? Would your answer be convincing? I confess there was a time when that question haunted me. I really didn't have a good answer for it. I grew up in the church. Sang Jesus Loves Me. I accepted Jesus Christ as my Lord and Savior at a young age and was baptized. But when I entered my teenage years and began thinking critically, I asked, "If I had been born into a different religion, would I still choose to follow Jesus?" What makes Christianity so special? There are roughly 4,200 religions in the world. Why should Christianity be any different than the rest of them? Maybe you have asked the same question. Do you wonder why you follow Jesus instead of another religion. Is it because you were born into a Christian home? Maybe a professor challenged you, a skeptical friend criticized you, or you watched a documentary on world religions which caused you to question the validity of your faith. Or perhaps you have always been on the edge of becoming a Christian. You want to follow Jesus, but the one obstacle for you has been the question, "Why Jesus instead of another religion?" I am going to tell you why. At the end of this message you will be able to tell your skeptical friends a compelling reason why you are a Christian. And if you are someone still searching for faith, this message just may be the tipping point for you.

  • Posted on 06 Nov 2018

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    Charley Reeb: Lose the Cape

      When I was in college, I went to a pool party. I remember it being pretty tame by college standards. The parents were home! However, the dad of the house was a lot of fun. We joked around, laughed and carried on. Later in the evening, we were sitting by the pool and the father asked me what my major was. I told him it was religion. He laughed and said, "Yeah, right." I said, "No, I'm serious, it is religion." He asked, "Why religion?" I told him I was going to be a preacher. He said, "A what? You don't seem like any preacher I know (I took it as a compliment). You laugh and joke and have fun. You seem normal." Before I left the party, he said something to me I will never forget, "I'm in my 50s and you are the first Christian I've ever met that I actually enjoy being around." I don't tell you that story because I'm the hero, because believe me, I'm not usually the hero of my stories! I share it because that dad at the party was not alone. There are many people who have never had a positive experience with Christians. Oliver Wendell Holmes once said, "I might have entered the ministry if certain clergymen I knew had not looked and acted so much like undertakers." Robert Louis Stevenson once entered in his diary, "I have been to church today, and am not depressed!" Of course, Gandhi was famous for saying, "I like your Christ. It is Christians I have a problem with." Shane Claiborne put it well, "Over the years, Christianity has lost its fascination because it looks less and less like Jesus."

  • Posted on 30 Oct 2018

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    Matt Gaventa: Home Repair 101

      I used to live in a slowly collapsing farmhouse. Just a few years back, in a small town in rural Virginia, my family and I were renting an old two-by-two that at some point in its long and undocumented history had clearly suffered either the slow withering of the foundation or perhaps it had been partially washed away by floods but the result regardless was that the house was slowly sinking in on itself. This had a variety of ill effects - no toy cars would stay put when you set them on the floor. Furniture along the outer walls of the house had to be carefully selected so that it wouldn't fall on top of us. Hanging pictures so they look level - which was never my specialty in the first place - became nearly impossible. But mostly, after a while, you just got used to it. A few extra hooks would align the pictures. A few extra bolts would secure the furniture. And for the rest of it, like the time during one particularly cold winter that the heating duct just snapped off from the vent underneath the living room, for the rest of it, we just relied on that most elemental repair tool. We just used duct tape. Thank God for duct tape. It couldn't fix the foundation but at least it could make the heat work. Without duct tape I don't think that place would have ever felt quite like home. Of course, duct tape's reputation precedes it. You don't need me to tell you this. These days duct tape has a bit of a magical reputation - for household repairs, sure, but also for construction on a grander scale. A quick glance online will unearth dozens upon hundreds of uses I'm sure quite unimagined by the folks who first put duct tape into the world: we've got duct tape as a fabric, with which folks have made everything from everyday wallets to prom dresses; we've got something called Duct Tape Occlusion Therapy, in which duct tape gets applied to warts and left on the skin for an extended period of time, though the results of this treatment are somewhat in dispute. Not to mention of course the many, many ways in which duct tape has become a repair tool for projects far beyond its original imagination: like, as a tarp that covers storm damage or as a patchwork fix holding up a streetlight. As a cradle for a car bumper as it cruises down the interstate. Even a quick fix wrapped around the wing of an airplane as it streaks through the skies. You don't need me to preach this Gospel. It's pretty well attested. The world breaks all the time. Our old house wasn't the only place with a crack running through the foundation. Good thing we have duct tape to patch it all back together.

  • Posted on 23 Oct 2018

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    Joe Evans: Where Were You?

      It's frustrating to ask a direct question without getting a direct answer, so I apologize, that as is the case so often with politicians, doctors, and lawyers, where many significant statements are made but few direct answers are given, we also have this Scripture lesson from the 38th chapter of Job, where after Job asked a direct question to God - "Why, Lord, must the innocent suffer?" - not even God seems willing to give a clear and direct answer in response. It's frustrating. What Job wants is the truth, but God seems to be echoing those iconic words of Jack Nicholson when he starred in "A Few Good Men," "You want the truth? You can't handle the truth." Our passage begins: "Then the Lord answered Job out of the whirlwind: 'Who is this that darkens counsel by words without knowledge? Gird up your loins like a man, I will question you, and you shall declare to me.'" This is not a gentle response, nor is it a direct answer, but anyone who asks questions has learned that sometimes you get an answer and sometimes you don't. I remember well enough a day in Sunday School long ago, we were in 4th or 5th grade and had just read the account in the Gospel of Luke chapter 2, "After eight days had passed, it was time to circumcise the child..." "Mr. Farrah," I asked my teacher, "what exactly is circumcision?" "Well that's a question you should probably ask your father," he responded.

  • Posted on 16 Oct 2018

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