Day1 Weekly Radio Broadcast - Day1 FeedsAuthor: Day1.org
18 Aug 2018

Day1 Weekly Radio Broadcast - Day1 Feeds

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Each week the Day1 program, hosted by Peter Wallace, presents an inspiring message from one of America's most compelling preachers representing the mainline Protestant churches. The interview segments inform you about the speaker and the sermon Scripture text, and share ways you can respond to the message personally in your faith and life.

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    Maxwell Grant: "Precarious Wisdom"

      Let me begin by admitting that it's a little bit of a tall order for a preacher to try saying something new about "wisdom." There's a certain school of thought that says, if it's new, well then by definition, it can't be wisdom. Wisdom is timeless - the very opposite of new. It isn't simply that wisdom "offers perspective," wisdom is perspective. It's an animating power in its own right. It's not a particular set of facts - if you just learn this or that, well then there you go: you've got wisdom. Wisdom is more like a way of knowing. I remember when my dad taught me to drive stick in the empty Sunday afternoon parking lot in front of our local competitor to Woolworth's, which was called the Ben Franklin 5 and 10. Do you remember learning to drive stick? It's all about the feet, right? Learning that strange two-step with the clutch and the gas. I remember my father explaining that move from zero to first gear, with his hands looking like they were playing invisible bongo drums, left...right...left...right. There are facts about how to drive stick. Of course there are. But until you can actually drive stick, it's as if the facts make no sense, isn't it? You have to know them in some deeper way before you can understand them. You need to have the peculiar wisdom of driving before any of the facts make sense. It's like it says in the Book of Proverbs: "Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting, get understanding" (Proverbs 4:7).

  • Posted on 14 Aug 2018

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    Diana Butler Bass: Bread Enough for All

      In 2016, Netflix produced a series called, Cooked, based on food-writer Michael Pollan's book about how basic ingredients are transformed into food through the four basic elements of fire, water, earth, and air. Although the series was full of surprises regarding the history of food, it is fairly easy to imagine how fire, water, and even earth create the food of myriad human cultures. But, air? Pollan admitted at the outset that "air" as transformation is the most mysterious, perhaps the most spiritual, of all the ways in which we cook. Despite the mystery of it, "air" has also give us the most basic of all food: bread. Bread was a bit of an accident - about 6,000 years ago in Egypt, when, as Pollan says, "some observant Egyptian must have noticed that a bowl of porridge, perhaps one off in a corner that had been neglected, was no longer quite so inert. In fact, it was hatching bubbles from its surface and slowly expanding, as if it were alive. The dull paste had somehow been inspired: The spark of life had been breathed into it. And when that strangely vibrant bowl of porridge - call it dough - was heated in an oven, it grew even larger, springing up as it trapped the expanding bubbles in an airy, yet stable, structure that resembled a sponge." (Cooked, p. 207) Bread. With bread, everything changed. We learned how to turn grasses into food human beings could eat, store, and transport. We learned how to cultivate grains and manage fields, how to harvest and mill and leaven and bake. We created agriculture. We developed entire communities - entire civilizations - devoted to the making of bread.

  • Posted on 07 Aug 2018

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    Susan Cartmell: What Have You Done?

      David was a charismatic leader, a brilliant strategist, an ambitious politician, and a man of enormous personal energy. He alone united Israel's various tribes, North and South, into one nation. From his childhood when he showed up to do battle with a sling, he was able to assess danger, recognize opportunity, and face fear. Stories of his military escapades dazzle the imagination, and though they may have grown in the telling, no one doubts his prowess. David was also human. Nowhere is his humanity revealed more tragically than here in this story about David and Bathsheba. Here, we realize that David's blessings were also his curse. His ambitious way of taking property extended to women, too. Let's take a closer look at this story to see what it is saying to us today. In the first place, the story of David and Bathsheba is about abuse of power, not an act of passion. David was promenading on the upper balcony of his palace one day when he spied Bathsheba bathing on the roof of her home. He was used to getting whatever he wanted; if he couldn't get it easily, he took it. So, David sent for Bathsheba and forced himself upon her. In time, she discovered she was pregnant and sent word to the king. Now Bathsheba was married, and her husband was a good man, a loyal officer in David's own army, but it didn't matter to David who Bathsheba was married to. It didn't matter how much his rape hurt her or her husband. This is not about passion; it was always about prerogative and power.

  • Posted on 31 Jul 2018

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    Kelly Hough Rogers: Abundance Born Out of Scarcity

      During my time in seminary, I had the good fortune to be a chaplain in a national park through an interdenominational ministry known as A Christian Ministry in the National Parks. Not all Christian Ministry in the National Parks host sites are places of great natural beauty. They are battlefields and monuments as well as forests, seashores, swamps and canyons. The National Parks system is full of sites that help us understand our unique American heritage. Whenever I am near a National Parks site, I visit. Not only do I visit to once again be awed by the wonder of creation, I visit to learn about the history of this nation. I visit to expand my worldview. And I visit to support this vital resource we are lucky enough to have and I visit to remind myself to pray and work toward the hope of maintaining this resource for future generations. Recently, I was attending a conference in San Francisco with my clergy community of practice and several of us decided to visit the area of Redwood Creek, which was preserved by William and Elizabeth Kent. Over 100 years ago, this area had yet to be logged as it was not easy to access. So, in 1905, the Kents purchased over 600 acres and preserved nearly 260 acres as Muir Woods. Muir Woods is a pristine example of an old-growth coastal redwood forest. Redwood trees are very unique. Most reproduce as part of a family circle, but occasionally seeds that fall on fresh mineral soil will germinate. Those lone, isolated trees never grow as tall as the trees in a family group. And they will only grow in soil that has been exposed by flooding, fire, or wind. It is only out of destruction that a lone redwood can be born. Redwood seeds are small; their cones are only an inch long and it would take 100,000 seeds to weigh a pound. But one tiny seed from one tiny cone is enough to grow the tallest species of tree in the United States.

  • Posted on 24 Jul 2018

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    William Flippin Jr.: Counterfeit Clergy

      Father Frederico B. Gomez de Esparza was a Catholic priest affectionately known throughout his parish in Yuma, Arizona as Father Fred. He was a priest that hailed from Mexico and who served bilingual parishes in Arizona. By all accounts, Father Fred did his job well. Everybody loved him. He was known for his sermon mastery and knowledge of the Roman Catholic Church. He also knew the Scriptures, administered the sacraments, comforted the sick, conducted wedding and funerals - everything that clergy are supposed to do. He was later found out of having no credentials and was counterfeit. The parishioners who trusted him were deceived, describing him as a "wolf in sheep clothing." The discovery of counterfeit clergy can often cast a shadow on others who serve faithfully. Incidents like this, however, can also help us clergy take a more in-depth look at Shepherding God's people authentically. What happens when a pastor isn't who he or she appears to be? The weeping prophet Jeremiah was troubled throughout his career by those who pretended to be real prophets but were not (27:16-22; 28; 29:8, 9). They preached a straightforward message of "peace in our time" and were no doubt popular. Here the prophet denounces them. He calls them "shepherds that destroy and scatter sheep of God's pasture for lack of visitation." Three significant accusations come against civil rulers who remind us of many of our politicians today.

  • Posted on 17 Jul 2018

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