From Our Own Correspondent PodcastAuthor: BBC Radio 4
04 Dec 2020

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Download, listen or watch all podcasts

Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie and Pascale Harter.

  • Listen

    Facing defeat in Nagorno-Karabakh

    Nagorno-Karabakh, the ethnic Armenian enclave within Azerbaijan, became the frontline of a war again this autumn. This resulted in Azerbaijan regaining some of the territory lost in previous conflicts – and with it, homes and landmarks that are precious to Armenians. Peter Oborne was there just as the current Russian-backed peacekeeping deal was announced. Political dramas in Peru reached new heights this month, when the country saw no fewer than three presidents in power in a single week. Tensions also spilled out onto the streets – with large demonstrations and battles between protesters and police in the capital Lima. Now the dust has settled, a new youth movement has come to the fore, as Dan Collyns reports. In the Pakistani city of Lahore, hundreds of thousands of people turned out for the funeral of a highly controversial cleric, Khadim Rizvi, who had campaigned for even stricter punishment of “blasphemers” – people accused of insulting Islam or the Prophet Mohammed. Rizvi and his supporters have been linked to violent attacks in Paris, Britain and in Pakistan. Secunder Kermani reflects on his life and his legacy. The city of Gatineau in Quebec in Canada has been designated a “red zone”, Canada’s highest level of pandemic restrictions. Schools have stayed open though, and one headteacher had an idea for how to keep everyone safe: he moved classes outdoors, in all weathers, as Sian Griffiths reports. France has been under a strict lockdown in recent weeks. Non-essential shops have been closed until today. Horatio Clare spent time in the city of Marseille on France’s Mediterranean coast during the lockdown. How has the normally bustling city fared, where "to arrive is to belong"? Presenter: Kate Adie Producer: Arlene Gregorius

  • Posted on 28 Nov 2020

    download
  • Listen

    United States: Presidential transitions

    In the United States, President Trump still hasn’t conceded that he has lost the election. His campaign is doubling down making claims of voter fraud. But without evidence. Meanwhile, the election winner, Joe Biden, is preparing to become president while being denied access to the briefings he is entitled to as President-elect, as Anthony Zurcher reports from Washington. Brazil’s president, Jair Bolsonaro, has been dubbed the Trump of the Tropics. Despite widespread criticism of his handling of the pandemic, he has been gaining support from an unexpected place recently – in the country's northeast, known as a left-wing stronghold. But a new welfare benefit is changing the political landscape there, as Katy Watson found. Russia passed the two-million mark of Covid-19 cases this week. One of the worst affected areas is the Archangelsk region in the north, on the White Sea of the Arctic Ocean. It's been hit so hard, that overstretched healthcare workers are defying their bosses and speaking out, as Sarah Rainsford reports. It's Black Friday next week, when retailers try to entice their customers with big discounts. In France however there’s talk of postponing the event because of the current lockdown, to give the smaller bricks-and-mortar shops a chance against the internet-based competition. Lucy Williamson has been to visit a legendary bookshop in Paris: Shakespeare and Company. The island of Madagascar has a wealth of different habitats, that are home to thousands of endemic species of plants and animals that exist nowhere else, like the round-eyed lemurs. But the remaining forests are under threat, as Michelle Jana Chan found out when trekking in a remote canyon. Presenter: Kate Adie Producer: Arlene Gregorius

  • Posted on 21 Nov 2020

    download
  • Listen

    Diwali in India during the pandemic

    For Hindus, Sikhs and Jains it's Diwali - the festival of lights. But this year there's the pandemic. What impact is that having in India, asks Rajini Vaidyanathan in Delhi. In Azerbaijan, the decades-long intermittent war with Armenia over the disputed enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh flared up again in September. Earlier this week, Russia brokered a deal to end the conflict. Olga Ivshina has just returned from the Azeri side of the frontline, where reporters' safety was not just threatened by shelling. The French Caribbean island of Martinique has a difficult relationship with its past. For about two hundred years the colony relied on enslaved Africans to work in its sugar cane plantations. Some think that period might have been shorter if it hadn't been for Josephine, the wife of Napoleon. And as Tim Whewell found, that's not the only sensitive subject of conversation on the island. Bicycles have been recommended as a safe form of transport in the pandemic, and cities around Europe have been improving their cycling infrastructure as a result. Anna Holligan lives in the Netherlands, where cycling is second nature to many, and says that even there, more people are now switching to two wheels. On Mosher Island off the coast of Canada’s Nova Scotia province, self-isolation takes on a different meaning. No need to worry about social distancing, there is no one to keep a distance from. The island only has two residents, a former lighthouse keeper and his wife. Greg Mercer paid them a visit. Presenter: Kate Adie Producer: Arlene Gregorius

  • Posted on 14 Nov 2020

    download
  • Listen

    US election: Georgia, the new swing state?

    In the US, lots of eyes are still on the outcome of the election in Georgia. Joe Biden appears to have to have narrowly won the state, but the margin is so narrow that local law requires a recount. Suzanne Kianpour hails from Atlanta, Georgia, and found herself back there as the votes were being counted. Parts of South East Asia’s largest remaining rainforests, in Indonesia’s Papua province, are being cleared to make way for oil palm plantations. Rebecca Henschke has been investigating allegations a Korean palm oil company was involved in unfair land deals with local tribes, and she hears from clan elders about what’s been lost. Venice is built on a lagoon, with canals for streets, and floods a common occurrence. There was a particularly devastating surge a year ago today. A flood barrier, delayed for decades, finally had its first full test last month. Called Mose, like Italian for Moses, will it be able to stop rising Venetian seas? Julia Buckley has been testing the waters. Iran has often been accused of repression at home – and assassination abroad. The regime targets its critics and enemies anywhere in the world and has been implicated in attacks from Argentina to the Netherlands. Jiyar Gol has been investigating the killings of two Dutch-Iranians . Have you come across the Greek dish kleftiko? It's slow-cooked lamb. The name is related to the words kleptocracy and kleptomania, the “klept” part of it being from the Greek for thief. In the case of the lamb recipe, the theft refers to sheep rustling. A tradition that goes back a long way in Crete, says Heidi Fuller-Love, but has recently become more serious. Presenter: Kate Adie Producer: Arlene Gregorius

  • Posted on 12 Nov 2020

    download
  • Listen

    The Murder of Afghanistan's Dreams

    A brutal assault on Kabul University, the biggest and oldest in the country, left at least 35 dead and 50 wounded. The attack was claimed by the Islamic State group, but the Afghan government and the Taliban are blaming each other for it, when the two sides are meant to be focusing on peace talks. Lyse Doucet speaks to one University lecturer about the students he lost. There was an attack in Austria too, in Vienna, which killed four people and injured more than 20 others, in a neighbourhood that houses Vienna's main synagogue, but is known as the Bermuda Triangle, a key nightlife area full of bars and restaurants. The shooting was the deadliest attack in Vienna for decades. Bethany Bell reports on an evening that shook a city. Eighteen Sicilian fishermen are being detained in prison in the Libyan city of Benghazi, accused of fishing in Libyan waters. This part of the Mediterranean is rich in the lucrative red prawn, and so these arrests are not uncommon. Usually the men are released after negotiations. But this time that's proving difficult, says Linda Pressly. In Kyrgyzstan, traditional turbans for women called elecheks are made with many metres of the finest white cotton. Nowadays women mostly wear headscarves, and the elecheks are kept as heirlooms. But during these pandemic times one textile collector has cut an elechek up to make masks for local hospitals, as Caroline Eden reports. Swallows that spend the summer in Britain have left for their winter destination of South Africa. The flight takes them several weeks, through France, Spain and Morocco, then across the Sahara, and the tropical rainforests. They eat flying insects. Stephen Moss went to look for them in a reed-bed on a lake near Durban. Presenter: Kate Adie Producer: Arlene Gregorius

  • Posted on 07 Nov 2020

    download

Follow Playlisto