From Our Own Correspondent PodcastAuthor: BBC Radio 4
15 Aug 2018

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Download, listen or watch all podcasts

Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie and Pascale Harter.

  • Listen

    Fighting for Life

    A hostage and captor meet again in Syria, anger grows amid Assam's floodwaters and young people take to the barricades in Nicaragua. Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories from around the world. Quentin Sommerville was wary of interviewing two former members of the so-called Islamic State: he didn't want to give them any kind of platform. But in Syria he did get to talk to them - and witness their reactions when a man whom they'd once held captive got to ask the questions. As monsoon storms lash the subcontinent and flood waters rise, Nick Beake speaks to farmers and families who feel exhausted and marginalised by an endlessly repeating cycle of disaster and rebuilding in the northeastern Indian state of Assam. In the past week, Argentina's Senate voted NOT to decriminalise abortion in the first three months of pregnancy - despite a vocal and vigorous campaign, led by women, to change the law. Katy Watson hears from both sides of the debate. Arturo Wallace returns to Nicaragua, his homeland, and is unnerved by echoes of history in this year's political crisis there - as street protests, state repression, and unidentified assassins return to the streets of Managua. And there's a football match in Agadez, Niger - a major stop-off on the migrant routes funnelling people from West Africa over the Sahara desert to the Mediterranean, and (they hope) to Europe. Jennifer O'Mahoney watches from the sidelines as local talent play newcomers, and even the kit is shared.

  • Posted on 11 Aug 2018

    download
  • Listen

    Zimbabwe - Where Fear is a Powerful Commodity

    The election was supposed to be the moment it turned a corner leaving fear behind. Kate Adie introduces correspondents’ stories from around the world: In Zimbabwe, Andrew Harding has followed the twists and turns of the past few days and reflects on the country’s struggle to shake off a repressive past. In Colombia, Frank Gardner meets a former FARC guerrilla commander now making friends with the police and goes in search of an illicit makeshift cocaine lab hidden in the jungle. In Holland euthanasia was legalised in 2002 but it remains controversial. While some say it should never be allowed as a means of dealing with psychiatric illness, Linda Pressly meets one bereaved mother who wants to make it easier for people to end their own lives. In Mongolia, Roger Hearing meets Ganbold Dorjzodov the man who exposed the 60 billion scam – an apparent plan to swap government jobs for substantial bribes. And in Albania Elizabeth Gowing finds herself surrounded by heaps of knickers and tables that are overflowing with bras – the textile industry is booming in Shkodra.

  • Posted on 04 Aug 2018

    download
  • Listen

    Looking Back

    Elections in Pakistan, religious divisions in the Balkans and an ode to an Ethiopian airport. Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories from around the world: Secunder Kermani looks back on the election campaign in Pakistan and assesses what it means for the country’s future. Anna Holligan travels around Bosnia - Herzegovina and finds that while the fighting may have ended more than twenty years ago, the country is even more religiously divided than it was before the war. Will Grant remembers a great man of Cuban radio - Raul Luis Galiano. As his family sort through the late broadcasters belonging they find a huge hoard of carefully preserved possessions – some useful, some of historical value and others surprisingly revealing. Mary Novakovich learns that while fish stocks are falling in Venice, local fishermen have stumbled on a new catch – tourists, and now take visitors out on expeditions to give them an idea of what life is like beyond the obvious attractions. And Horatio Clare has an apology to make; Addis Ababa Bole airport has not, as he predicted, turned out to be a huge waste of money – unnecessary and over the top. Instead, it has turned out to be a shrewd investment and a place that continues to fascinate him.

  • Posted on 28 Jul 2018

    download
  • Listen

    From Our Home Correspondent 22/07/2018

    In the latest programme of the monthly series, Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from writers and journalists around the United Kingdom that reflect the range of contemporary life in the country. The BBC's Social Affairs Correspondent, Michael Buchanan, tells the story of a man, now in his fifties, who discovered only after the funeral of the woman he thought was his mother, that he was adopted and that his birth mother was seeking to find him. Sally Green, the children's and young adults author, explains the appeal of taking part in the weekly Warrington parkrun over 5 kilometres (three miles). Datshiane Navanayagam talks to one family about the scourge of homelessness among those in full-time work. Chris Bowlby journeys on what remains of the route of the Stockton to Darlington railway - England's first public steam-powered track - and reflects on the current state of train services in north-east England. And Mary-Ann Ochota, a keen hill-walker, travels to the Isle of Skye for her latest challenge - the ascent of the Inaccessible Pinnacle - and finds its name all too apt. Producer: Simon Coates

  • Posted on 22 Jul 2018

    download
  • Listen

    Warfare - the Soundtrack of Their Lives

    Children who are able to survive the ongoing civil war have to grow up fast in Yemen. Kate Adie introduces stories, insight, and analysis from correspondents around the world: According to The United Nations, one child under five dies every ten minutes from preventable causes in Yemen. Orla Guerin meets some of the families struggling on and speaks to the President Ab’d Rabbu Mansur Hadi about the conflict. In South Korea, Simon Maybin attends a lesson in the etiquette of dating, kissing and respecting your partner as the country tries to turn around its declining birth rate. In Tunisia, Charlotte Bailey hears why young men are setting themselves on fire – just as Mohamed Bouazizi did in 2010. His death was one of the catalysts of the Arab Spring. In the USA, Christine Finn follows in the footsteps of Henry David Thoreau and explores the shores of Walden Pond. And as Justin Rowlatt leaves India and auctions off his belongings, he learns that you can put a price on just about anything.

  • Posted on 21 Jul 2018

    download

Follow Playlisto