From Our Own Correspondent PodcastAuthor: BBC Radio 4
23 Feb 2019

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

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Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie and Pascale Harter.

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    Take It Gently

    Uruguay's anti-drug laws were never as strict as expected - and its path to decriminalisation of cannabis has also been full of paradox. Simon Maybin explores why the country's taken a slow and steady path to regulate marijuana growers and sellers - and visits a greenhouse full of legal weed. Kate Adie introduces this and other stories from correspondents around the world. In Nepal, joining the ranks of the British Army's Gurkhas has long been one of the few options for a stable income. Regimental wages have kept some whole villages, not just families, solvent - so there's a lot riding on the selection process. Hannah King of BFBS witnessed the most recent intake and saw how these young men are prepared for a drastic change in their lives. Over recent weeks the streets of Haiti have simmered with discontent, with protesters confronting police and the army in the capital, Port au Prince, over systemic corruption, rising food prices and enduring inequality. Thomas Rees describes how the rising tensions made themselves felt on the streets. On the Karakorum Highway, Chris Haslam sat down to talk business with the driver of one of Pakistan's famous painted trucks - the elaborately-decorated palaces on wheels which haul goods and passengers along one of the highest-altitude roads in the world. But times are changing for them, with competition from "vast Chinese behemoths" now plying the same route as part of the Belt and Road expansion. And as the world worries over reports of deforestation and dwindling insect numbers around the world, Emilie Filou has a rare tale of revival from Madagascar - with the story of how one NGO has brought back the art of weaving a special kind of silk, made not by worms but by a unique local moth.

  • Posted on 21 Feb 2019

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    From Our Home Correspondent 17/02/2019

    Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from journalists and writers around the United Kingdom which reflect the range of British life today. Writer and broadcaster Horatio Clare reveals the deeply personal story of how he was sectioned under the Mental Health Act and his experiences on an in-patient ward in Yorkshire. In the month of the National Parks Dark Skies Festival and a star-counting survey run by the British Astronomical Association and the Campaign to Protect Rural England, Andrew Green discovers why an unblemished night sky is so hard to find even in the Chilterns - and why that matters. We often take our senses for granted. Charmaine Cozier recounts how she suddenly came to lose her sense of smell - and also to be left with a much diminished sense of taste - and explains the various strategies she's employed to try and recover them. With little sign of an early end to Britain's housing problems, the ups and downs of squatting in a former industrial building are described by Lizzy McNeill. And Adrian Goldberg climbs aboard "the cutest train in England" which, in its canary-yellow livery journeys modestly between stops in the West Midlands town of Stourbridge, yet offers a possible solution to transport problems elsewhere in the UK. Producer: Simon Coates

  • Posted on 17 Feb 2019

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    The Power of God

    The remote religious retreat which has become the intellectual spearhead of Steve Bannon’s plans for a populist revolution in Europe. Edward Stourton visits the Trisulti monastery in Italy from where the vision of the former chief strategist to Donald Trump is being spread. Kate Adie introduces this and other stories from correspondents around the world. Lois Pryce is in Jamaica. As the battle against gang violence continues, and soldiers patrol some of its streets, she visits a village which claims to have almost no crime at all. Nick Thorpe examines plans to boost the fertility rate in Hungary with cash and cars on offer for people willing to do their patriotic duty and make babies. Sarah Treanor meets a young Muslim woman in Zanzibar who is flying drones to map the island and help save lives. And Mike Thomson discovers that there are limits to the President's power in Liberia. He watches George Weah play football, have lunch and fail to get a flight delayed.

  • Posted on 16 Feb 2019

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    Celebrating the Iranian revolution in Lebanon

    In much of the world Hezbollah is considered a terrorist organisation, but in Lebanon it is one of the country’s most powerful political and military forces. Lizzie Porter was in Beirut as the Iranian backed group began a three-day festival to mark the 40th anniversary of the Islamic revolution in Iran. Kate Adie introduces this and other stories from correspondents around the world: Mark Lobel tries to make sense of Dubai where migrant workers are welcomed with open arms – until they become a burden that is or fail to follow the rules. Katy Fallon is on the Greek island of Lesvos where she visits a community centre offering rare respite to the thousands of migrants crammed into a dangerous and dilapidated camp. Matt Pickles asks what the rest of the world can learn from Finland’s education system as he tours a school that comes with a class lizard and a couple of dogs.

  • Posted on 14 Feb 2019

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    Peace Is More Difficult Than War

    Moscow isn’t the obvious place for talks on how to bring an end to the violence in Afghanistan, the country has been at war ever since the Soviet invasion 40 years ago, but it was where senior Afghan politicians met the Taliban. 'A military solution is not the answer' was the message Secunder Kermani picked up from negotiators there. Kate Adie introduces this and other stories from around the world: Juliet Rix is in Dominica, an island known for its natural beauty, national parks, and volcanoes. How is it faring almost eighteen months on from Hurricane Maria? Kevin Connolly returns to Belgrade and is confronted by some ghosts from his first visit to what was then Yugoslavia, back when he was "untouched by experience and unburdened by judgment." Elizabeth Hotson experiences a sugar-rush like no other as she attends the world's largest sweet and snack fair in Germany. And Viv Nuis finds out why the skies above Lahore won't be filled with thousands of kites for the Basant festival this weekend, and why flying a kite can even get you arrested in the Pakistani city.

  • Posted on 09 Feb 2019

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