From Our Own Correspondent PodcastAuthor: BBC Radio 4
27 May 2018

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

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Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie and Pascale Harter.

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    A Boarding School For Boko Haram?

    Why some schools are sending their students out to beg in northern Nigeria. Kate Adie introduces stories from correspondents around the world: Colin Freeman hears how students at some madrassas in Maiduguri are vulnerable to jihadi recruiters for Boko Haram, and he learns why going out to beg is part of the school timetable. No one is suffering - one senior government figure in Venezuela tells Katy Watson; despite the country's continuing economic collapse, the people going hungry and the shortage of essential medicines. Tim Luard finds that China's influence in Sri Lanka is growing, meaning locals now find some places are out of bounds. In India, Melissa Van Der Klugt meets the craftsmen of Mandvi who are keeping alive the 400-year old skill of making wooden boats by hand. And in the Portuguese capital, Paddy O'Connell finds Lisboners sit in a nutcracker caught between short-term holidaymakers and digital nomads - but is Paddy part of the problem?

  • Posted on 26 May 2018

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    Malaysia’s Political Drama

    A whirlwind of shifting loyalties, rotating characters, and plot twist after plot twist. Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories from around the world: Jonathan Head finds himself thinking of Shakespeare as he tries to make sense of recent events in Malaysia. Jo Glanville is in Berlin as some of those driven from the city by the Nazi regime return to their old homes to teach young Berliners about this dark chapter in the city's history. Edmund Bower reflects on how a Premier League footballer has restored a sense of national pride for some Egyptians. Mo Salah has become known as “The Egyptian King of England. ” As hurricane season is approaches once again, Rossalyn Warren hears how some Puerto Ricans are still struggling to deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria which tore through the island eight months ago, And Simon Busch indulges in a bit of ironic retro nostalgia as Soviet era fashion is making a comeback - think stripy high-waited sports shorts, lurid checks and string vests.

  • Posted on 24 May 2018

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    From Our Home Correspondent 20/05/2018

    In the latest programme of the monthly series, Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from journalists and writers around the United Kingdom that reflect the range of contemporary life in the country. Gabriel Gatehouse reflects on the lot of the reluctant courting correspondent come a royal wedding; Sarah Smith considers where the latest vote on Brexit at Holyrood leaves the Scottish First Minister as she weighs her options on advancing the SNP's principal objective; Martin Bashir assesses the Archbishop of Canterbury's lonely repentance at the Independent Inquiry into Child Abuse; Caitlin Sneddon visits an isle made famous by a girl's adventures which is now bereft of high school-age children; and Martin Vennard considers what connects a Redcar cinema and petrified forest. Producer: Simon Coates

  • Posted on 20 May 2018

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    Toothpaste, Mud Bricks and Sparkling Wine

    Kate Adie introduces stories and insight from Iraq, Iran, Israel, Ireland and Spain: Jeremy Bowen is in Mosul for the first elections there since the defeat of Islamic State. An exceptional leader is needed to help Iraq recover, he says, though he isn’t hopeful that one will emerge. Rana Rahimpour explores what the US’s withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal might mean for the people of Iran - including their taste for toothpaste. Simon Maybin visits a Bible camp where one Jewish Ethiopian student is testing Israel’s approach to citizenship. Vincent Woods attempts to unravel the knots of politics, religion, and morality that lie behind Ireland’s upcoming referendum on changes to its abortion laws. And John Murphy meets the independent winemakers of Catalonia trying to escape Cava’s image problem and low prices.

  • Posted on 12 May 2018

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    Not Welcome Here

    Tales of revolutions, rainforests and the migrants returning home from Libya. Kate Adie introduces stories and insight from correspondents around the world: In Nigeria, Colin Freeman meets some of the migrants who have given up on their European dreams and accepted the UN’s help to return home. The ‘Velvet Revolution’ in Armenia saw its prime minister (and former president) relinquish power – all without a shot being fired. Rayhan Demytrie was in the capital Yerevan as tens of thousands of people took to the streets demanding change. “Scum of the earth” is how one Goan politician described visitors from other parts of India, prompting Sushma Puri to try and find out what other residents of the southern Indian state think about domestic tourists. The usual rule of thumb in rainforests is that you hear lots and see little, says Huw Cordey, but things were different in Suriname thanks to his guide Fred Pansa, who might just become the most famous South American conservationist from a country few have heard of. And in France, Hugh Schofield stumbles across the grave, and the story, of the once-celebrated, and now largely forgotten English war poet Richard Aldington.

  • Posted on 05 May 2018

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