Imagineering My Way PodcastAuthor: Greg McNaughten
22 Oct 2018

Imagineering My Way Podcast

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An examination of the world of Disney design, music, commentary, park audio, and more. Join Greg, a former Disneyland Cast Member, for a podcast full of opinions and fun.

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    M47 (Patton II) Medium Tank [Flickr]

    Greg Nutt posted a photo:

    M47 (Patton II) Medium Tank

    The M47 Patton was an American main battle tank, a development of the M46 Patton mounting an updated turret, and was in turn further developed as the M48 Patton. It was the second American tank to be named after General George S. Patton, commander of the U.S. Third Army during World War II and one of the earliest American advocates of tanks in battle.

    The M47 was the U.S. Army's and Marine Corps' primary tank, intended to replace the M46 Patton and M4 Sherman medium tanks. The M47 was widely used by U.S. Cold War allies, both SEATO and NATO countries, and was the only Patton series tank that never saw combat while in US service.

    Although similar in appearance to the later M48s and M60s, these were completely new tank designs. Many different M47 Patton models remain in service internationally. The M47 was the last US tank to have a bow-mounted machine gun in the hull.

    Deployment
    With the arrival of the improved M48 Patton in 1953, the M47 was declared 'limited standard' in 1955, and examples in tank units were replaced with the M48 series before long. After being declared obsolete in 1957, M46s and M47s were retained in active duty infantry division battlegroup assault gun platoons (four tanks each, one platoon per battlegroup, for a total of 20 tanks per division) until replaced with the light truck-mounted SS-10 anti-tank guided missile in the early 1960s. M47s were used by the Reserves for a relatively short time, soon being replaced by early production M48 Patton series tanks; thus, most of the M47s were exported in the late 1950s.

    The US Marine Corps also fielded M47s starting in late 1952; after the Korean War, all seven Marine tank battalions, three divisional, two reserve training, and two force level, each fielded M47s. But these were soon replaced with M48A1 Pattons and M103 heavy tanks, with the last M47s being retired in 1959.

    The M47 was widely used by many countries, especially NATO and SEATO allies, including Austria (147), Belgium (784), Ethiopia (30), France (856), Greece (396 from USA and West Germany), Iran (around 400), Italy (2,480), Japan (1 for evaluation only), Jordan (49), Pakistan (100), Portugal (161), Saudi Arabia (23 from the US, 108 on the international market), Somalia (25 from Saudi Arabia), South Korea (531), Sudan (17 from Saudi Arabia), Spain (389), Switzerland (2 for evaluation), Turkey (1,347 from the US and West Germany), West Germany (1,120), and Yugoslavia (319). Like the US Army of the time, the West German Bundeswehr also used some of their M47s as interim tank destroyers/assault guns until replaced by the Raketenjagdpanzer 1 tank destroyers armed with SS-11 anti-tank guided missiles in the early 1960s.

    US Army M47s remaining in storage were expended as targets. In the 1970s, they were used for the M60A1's 105mm gun with devastating effect. The 105 mm HEAT round would penetrate the frontal armor with ease. Many M47s in like-new condition met their fate in this manner, showing the M60 crews first hand the effects of modern tank weapons on conventional steel armor.


  • Posted on 01 Jan 2018

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    General George Patton Statue @ The General Patton Memorial Museum [Flickr]

    Greg Nutt posted a photo:

    General George Patton Statue @ The General Patton Memorial Museum

    The General Patton Memorial Museum was built to inspire such reverence through exposure and education. Quality of life for each visitor is directly tied to the health of this nation and we strive to ensure each visitor leaves the museum with a renewed understanding of that. We are committed to providing a place to learn about preserving the past and ensuring the lessons it teaches us are carried to future generations.

    The name General Patton was selected because he had actually handpicked the site and was the first commander of the DTC with Camp Young as the headquarters for the Desert Training Center, eventually training over a million men to go into the WWII effort. This became the world’s largest military installation both in size and population stretching from Arizona to Nevada to California. Leslie continues to work for the BLM and resides now in Colorado, and Margit lives at Chiriaco Summit and continues to serve as an active supporter of the museum.

    The first year was spent creating a 501(c)3 and forming an MOU with Bureau of Land Management which continues today. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) had a mobile home that became the first office and repository for information and artifacts. Senator Presley helped the Museum to obtain the old Coachella DMV office which was moved to the site at Chiriaco Summit. The land was donated by Joseph L. Chiriaco and Ruth E. Chiriaco, pioneers of the area. In 1986 five more modules were purchased creating a 7000-square foot area to serve as the museum building. Construction began in earnest in 1987 with a solid team of retirees from SCE headed by Jerry Rusche. This group of men worked long and hard creating the interior spaces of the museum, cleaning up and modifying the spaces, installing new electrical, refrigeration, heating and everything else that went into the interior space, as well as overseeing the exterior plastering of the building. The rock was donated by the Whitewater Rock and the Sea Bees were the volunteers, who installed the rock walls one summer.

    The first year was spent creating a 501(c)3 and forming an MOU with Bureau of Land Management which continues today. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) had a mobile home that became the first office and repository for information and artifacts. Senator Presley helped the Museum to obtain the old Coachella DMV office which was moved to the site at Chiriaco Summit. The land was donated by Joseph L. Chiriaco and Ruth E. Chiriaco, pioneers of the area. In 1986 five more modules were purchased creating a 7000-square foot area to serve as the museum building. Construction began in earnest in 1987 with a solid team of retirees from SCE headed by Jerry Rusche. This group of men worked long and hard creating the interior spaces of the museum, cleaning up and modifying the spaces, installing new electrical, refrigeration, heating and everything else that went into the interior space, as well as overseeing the exterior plastering of the building. The rock was donated by the Whitewater Rock and the Sea Bees were the volunteers, who installed the rock walls one summer.

    The foundations were constructed and donated by Modern Alloy. The firm of Krieger and Stewart donated the engineering for the facility, and Joe Aklufi did the legal work. Corky Larson, Riverside County Supervisor also played an important role in the project. The first really professional exhibit was the MWD topographical map – the map shows the vast regions of Southern California where the massive aqueduct was installed bringing the much needed water to Los Angeles.

    The availability of water to the DTC is the main reason that Patton selected the area for the DTC and placed the camps accordingly. This is aside from the fact that this desert area so mimicked the areas of North Africa and he could train the men in these harsh conditions preparing them for their eventual service in the war.

    During the building process, personalized engraved bricks were sold to finance parts of the project that just could not be donated. Today there is a large wall area covered with bricks, both large and small, which are still being sold and installed. Over time, the building was beginning to look more like the General Patton Memorial Museum. This transformation took many hours of volunteer service. The Museum was ready to open on November 11,1988 at 11 in the morning, coincidentally Patton’s one-hundredth birthday.


  • Posted on 01 Jan 2018

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    SR-71 Canopy @ the Museum of the Forgotten Warriors [Flickr]

    Greg Nutt posted a photo:

    SR-71 Canopy @ the Museum of the Forgotten Warriors


  • Posted on 30 Dec 2017

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    Sunset over Yuba County, CA [Flickr]

    Greg Nutt posted a photo:

    Sunset over Yuba County, CA


  • Posted on 30 Dec 2017

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    Iraq & Afghanistan Fallen Soldier Memorial [Flickr]

    Greg Nutt posted a photo:

    Iraq & Afghanistan Fallen Soldier Memorial

    Located at the Museum of Forgotten Warriors and Library Center in Marysville, CA


  • Posted on 30 Dec 2017

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