MicrobeWorld VideoAuthor: American Society for Microbiology
27 Apr 2017

MicrobeWorld Video

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A video podcast by the American Society for Microbiology that highlights the latest in microbiology, life science and biotechnology news. ASM is composed of over 42,000 scientists and health professionals with the mission to advance the microbial sciences as a vehicle for understanding life processes and to apply and communicate this knowledge for the improvement of health and environmental and economic well-being worldwide. For information about ASM and MicrobeWorld, visit us online at www.microbeworld.org. For questions and/or feedback please email ccondayan@asmusa.org.

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    MWV 110 - How to Create Agar Art Using Living Microbes

    Step inside the creative process with Agar Art 2015 winners Maria Peñil Cobo, Mixed Media Artist, and Mehmet Berkmen, PhD, Staff Scientist at New England Biolabs. During their multi-year collaboration, Maria and Memo have created astonishing works of art using living microbes. Find out how they meld science and art with this behind-the-scenes how-to video guide.

    Inspired? Submit your own agar art to ASM’s Agar Art 2017 contest through April 27, 2017 - http://www.asm.org/index.php/public-outreach/agar-art

    Prizes include up to $200 in Amazon gift cards and the chance for your art to be featured in the Agar Art Gallery at ASM Microbe 2017 (http://www.asm.org/index.php/asm-microbe-2017), June 1-5, 2017 in New Orleans, LA. Submissions must be high-resolution photos of an organism(s) growing on agar. Submitting artists must be ASM members ( http://asmscience.org/content/membership/all) or work with an official ASM Agar Art partner organization to create the submitted piece. Questions? Contact communications@asmusa.org.

     


  • Posted on 01 Mar 2017

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    MWV 109 - The Never-ending Vaccine Race

    Veteran medical journalist Meredith Wadman discuses her book The Vaccine Race. It tells the timely, epic, and controversial story of the development of the first widely-used normal human cell line and, through it, important viral vaccines, including the vaccine for rubella (German measles). Far from being an instrument of history, vaccine development in the modern era is targeting new (and reemerging) infectious diseases, including Ebola, Zika, Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). Dr. April Killikelly, a scientist at NIH's Vaccine Research Center, discusses the latest tools and technologies used to design tomorrow’s vaccines.

    About the Speakers

    Meredith K. Wadman, B.M., B.Ch., M.Sc.
    Staff Writer, Science

    Meredith Wadman is a neuroscience reporter at Science magazine in Washington, D.C. Before joining Science, Wadman was an editorial fellow at New America, a Washington, D.C. think tank. Prior to that, she was a reporter covering the medical research community for Nature for 17 years. She has also written on biotech and on biomedical policy issues for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Time and Fortune magazine. Wadman is a graduate of Stanford University and completed medical school at Oxford, where she was a Rhodes Scholar. She also earned a master's degree at the graduate school of journalism at Columbia University.

    April Killikelly, PhD
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, National Institutes of Health

    Dr. Killikelly is a Postdoctoral fellow working on a vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) with Dr. Barney Graham at the Vaccine Research Center (NIAID/VRC). April is also a special volunteer with the Outreach and Education office of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. She is passionate about using outreach and education to place science in the broader context of culture and as drivers for societal change.


  • Posted on 27 Feb 2017

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    MWV 108 - My First Microscope

    In late July, 2016 ASM ventured below the equator, joining public and private sector partners at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation’s (APEC) Women in Science (WiSci) STEAM Camp in Chaclacayo, Peru. ASM Young Ambassador to Uruguay, Dr. Paola Scavone, and ASM Program Coordinator Laetitia Diatezua led four microbiology workshops in Spanish at the camp, teaching 100 girls how to build a cell-phone microscope, plate bacteria, extract DNA, and view bacteria using their handmade microscopes. This year’s camp was a joint collaboration between private sector entities, and the White House’s Let Girls Learn Initiative, US Department of State, UN Foundation’s Girl Up, and APEC’s Women in the Economy focus.


  • Posted on 17 Nov 2016

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    MWV 107 - The Necrobiome: Microbial Life After Death

    What happens to us after we die?  A decomposing corpse becomes its own mini-ecosystem, hosting insects, scavengers and multitudes of microbes.  Microbes from the environment, the corpse, as well as the insects and scavengers are blended together and work to recycle tissues back to their constituents.  Dr. Jennifer DeBruyn discusses the fascinating process of human decomposition, and how scientists are using that information to inform forensic science, livestock mortality management and fossilization. 


  • Posted on 20 Oct 2016

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    MWV 106 - This Week in Virology - Boston Quammens

    Four years after filming 'Threading the NEIDL', Vincent and Alan return to the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory BSL4 facility at Boston University where they speak with science writer David Quammen.

    Links for this episode

    This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/microbe and use the promo code MICROBE.

    This episode is also brought to you by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. Visit www.drobo.com to learn more. Listeners can save $100 on a Drobo system at drobostore.com by using the discount code Microbe100.

    Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv


  • Posted on 25 Sep 2016

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