Living on EarthAuthor: PRI/World Media Foundation
23 Mar 2019

Living on Earth

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Living on Earth is a weekly news and information program from PRI about the world's changing environment, ecology, and human health. If there's something new about global warming, climate change, environmental politics or environmental quality and human health, you can count on Host Steve Curwood and the LOE public radio news team to keep you up to date with fair and accurate coverage.

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    Minorities' Pollution Burden, Oil Drilling on 500,000 Acres Blocked for Climate, Sen. Murkowski (R-AK) on the Public Lands Bill, and more

    Oil Drilling Blocked for Climate / Climate Disasters and Softening Property Values / The Racial Gap of Pollution Responsibility / Beyond the Headlines / GOP Senator Lisa Murkowski on the 2019 Public Lands Act / Baboon, "The Observer" In this week's episode, a federal judge temporarily blocked drilling after he found the Bureau of Land Management failed to adequately consider climate impacts when it held lease sales for oil and gas extraction on hundreds of thousands of acres in Wyoming, Colorado and Utah. And Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska has worked for years with Republican and Democratic colleagues to bring together the most sweeping land conservation bill in a decade, and joins us to discuss public lands and climate change. Also, climate change is stoking losses from the recent floods in Southern Africa to the flooding in the US Midwest, and in coastal communities, rising seas are eating away at local tax bases, compounding the devastation. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 22 Mar 2019

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    Youth Strike for Climate, Carbon Pricing and the Green New Deal, Michael Mann Fights For Science, and more

    Youth Strike for Climate / Carbon Pricing and the Green New Deal / Beyond The Headlines / BirdNote®: How a Bird Came to Look Like a Caterpillar / "Hockey Stick" Climatologist Wins Tyler Prize In this episode: A million or more students around the world join the Youth Climate Strike March 15th, inspired by Swedish activist Greta Thunberg and her school strike in front of the Swedish Parliament beginning in August of 2018. Also, the Green New Deal resolution recently introduced in Congress is criticized for ignoring carbon pricing. And climatologist Michael Mann became known for developing the "hockey stick" graph showing global temperature rise, which won him the respect of the scientific community as well as the ire of the fossil fuel industry. He's sharing the 2019 Tyler Environmental Prize. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 15 Mar 2019

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    Tornado Clusters and Climate Disruption, Cloning the Giant Sequoia, In Search of the Canary Tree, and more

    Tornado Clusters and Climate Disruption / Beyond the Headlines / Oceans Losing Oxygen / Note on Emerging Science: Matchmaking for a Frog Named "Romeo" / Cloning Giant Sequoias / In Search of the Canary Tree In this episode, climate disruption -- and resiliency. Outbreaks of tornado clusters are being stoked by climate change, with 40 on the day that the strongest one devastated Lee County, Alabama. Meanwhile, warmer water holds less oxygen than cooler water does, so as climate change warms the oceans, they're losing oxygen. Pollutants like nitrogen and phosphorus, also contribute to oxygen-starved "dead zones." The warming planet is affecting forests, too, but they can be amazingly resilient. A nonprofit is working to give Coast Redwoods and Giant Sequoias a leg up on resiliency by cloning the hardiest trees. And the author of the new book, "In Search of the Canary Tree," shares how forests, and communities in Southeast Alaska, are transforming in the wake of mass die-offs of giant cypresses known as yellow cedars. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 08 Mar 2019

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    Voters Grant Lake Erie Legal Rights, Volkswagen's All-Electric Future, A Tribute to Dick Wheeler and the Extinct Great Auk, and more

    Lake Erie Wins Legal Rights / Beyond the Headlines / Volkswagen Goes All-Electric / Science Note: Using Mushrooms to Save The Bees / A Great Egret's Mating Dance / Remembering Dick Wheeler and the Great Auk In this episode, the citizens of Toledo, Ohio have taken a major step to protect Lake Erie, the main source of their drinking water. They voted by a wide margin to grant the Lake Erie Watershed legal rights, so that people can bring lawsuits on behalf of the lake itself. Also, as Volkswagen continues to work on repairing its image in the wake of its diesel emissions scandal, the German car manufacturer is turning over a new leaf with its announcement of a major all-electric car factory, to come online in 2022. And Living on Earth pays a tribute to the late Dick Wheeler with a reprise of the story of his journey kayaking 1,500 miles along the migration route of the now-extinct Great Auk. We enlisted the help of master storyteller Jay O'Callahan and Dick Wheeler himself to tell this story, pulled from our 1999 archives. Those stories and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 01 Mar 2019

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    Wall Street and the Green New Deal, Listening to Forests to Aid Conservation, Saltwater Beavers Promote Estuary Health, and more

    Wall Street and the Green New Deal / Beyond the Headlines / Listening to Forests Can Aid Conservation / California Tree Deaths Could Hurt Forests on the East Coast / Confronting Climate Change Through Sound / Saltwater Beavers Bring Life Back to Estuaries / BirdNote®: Anna's Hummingbirds Winter in the North This week on Living on Earth, critics of the Green New Deal are quick to point out its significant costs. But the federal government may not need to finance it alone: investors might be enticed to claim a slice of the Green New Deal pie. Also, it turns out that beavers, a keystone species in some freshwater ecosystems, could hold the key to help restore degraded coastal habitats, too. Their intertidal dams could provide crucial habitat for salmon, waterfowl, and many other species. And listening to forests might help protect them. Scientists are gathering acoustic data from animals that make sounds, like birds, primates and insects, to illuminate the health of a forest and even catch illegal loggers and poachers in the act. Those stories and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 22 Feb 2019

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