Living on EarthAuthor: PRI/World Media Foundation
20 Sep 2019

Living on Earth

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Living on Earth is a weekly news and information program from PRI about the world's changing environment, ecology, and human health. If there's something new about global warming, climate change, environmental politics or environmental quality and human health, you can count on Host Steve Curwood and the LOE public radio news team to keep you up to date with fair and accurate coverage.

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    The Border Wall and Wildlife, Coal Plant Ash Disaster for Workers, Andrew Yang's Climate Plan, and more

    Coal Ash Cleanup Allegedly Deadly for Tennessee Workers / Andrew Yang's Climate Plan / Beyond the Headlines / Pronghorn Antelope / How the Border Wall Could Harm Wildlife Dozens of workers who helped clean up a 2008 coal ash spill in Tennessee have died and hundreds more fallen ill from diseases linked to the disaster. Now a fight for justice for these workers has won a round in the courts. Also, how President Trump's border wall could sever habitats and migratory paths for wildlife in the borderlands, including birds. And Democratic Presidential candidate Andrew Yang says his proposed "Freedom Dividend" of a thousand dollars a month to every American over 18 could help kickstart the fight against climate change. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 13 Sep 2019

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    Climate Crisis Town Hall, The Amazon's Tipping Point, Underland: A Deep Time Journey, and more

    Amazon Tipping Point / Democratic Candidates Talk Solutions at Climate Town Hall / Reviewing the Climate Crisis Town Hall / Beyond The Headlines / Underland: A Deep Time Journey The fires in the Amazon rainforest are illuminating the alarming speed of deforestation in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth - and bringing it closer to a "tipping point" transition into dry savannah. Also, Democratic presidential hopefuls spell out their plans to address the climate emergency at town halls hosted by CNN, and a Harvard economist reviews their schemes. And author Robert Macfarlane ventures into ice caves, braves underwater rivers, and crawls through catacombs to discover the "deep time" running beneath our feet. Those stories and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 06 Sep 2019

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    Gaza Water Crisis, Saltwater Beavers Promote Estuary Health, Everglades National Park: a “River of Grass”, and more

    Saltwater Beavers Bring Life Back to Estuaries / Everglades National Park, a "River of Grass" / Drilling in the Everglades / Fly-fishing Saved From Pollution / Gaza Water Crisis In the Gaza Strip, where every three out of four people are refugees, clean water is scarce and there's a worsening health crisis for Gaza's children. Also, it turns out that beavers, a keystone species in some freshwater ecosystems, could hold the key to help restore degraded coastal habitats, too. And Everglades National Park provides a place of sanctuary in nature for those looking for peace and quiet, as well as a front-row-seat view of wildlife like alligators. The "River of Grass" and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 30 Aug 2019

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    Farming While Black, Toxic Diapers and Sanitary Pads, A Steamy Date for 'Romeo and Juliet' Frogs, and more

    Toxicants in Diapers and Sanitary Pads / 'Romeo and Juliet' Frogs' First Steamy Date / Exploring The Parks: North Cascades National Park / Refugees Cultivate Healing Through Gardening / Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm's Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land A recent study finds that single-use diapers and sanitary pads contain phthalates and volatile organic compounds, chemicals that are known to cause a variety of health complications including birth defects and endocrine disruption. Also, meet the farmers who are working to cultivate justice and root out racism, by reconnecting people of color to the earth. And Sehuencas water frogs, like other amphibians, have been devastated by the chytrid fungus, and a frog that scientists named "Romeo" was the last known frog of his kind and had stopped singing for a mate. But recently scientists discovered "Juliet" hiding in the Bolivian cloud forest, and now Romeo's song is back. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 23 Aug 2019

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    Re-wilding the English Countryside, Climate Migrant Caravans, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

    Climate Migrant Caravans / The Place Where You Live: Anchorage, Alaska / Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon / Confronting Climate Change Through Sound / Rewilding The English Countryside The recent waves of migrant caravans coming from Central America have a link to climate change: many of the migrants are fleeing their homes in the wake of crop failures, the result of a massive drought that has lasted for five years. Also, the constant onslaught of grim statistics about climate change may cause some people to shut down. Eco-acoustics could hold the key to drawing people back into a conversation about our changing climate. And an experiment in "re-wilding" a farm in England brings ecological and financial benefits from sustainable hunting and ecotourism. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

  • Posted on 16 Aug 2019

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