Reason Video PodcastAuthor: Reason.com
20 Feb 2019

Reason Video Podcast

Download, listen or watch all podcasts

This video podcast features the latest stories from Reason TV, the video-journalism arm of Reason—the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a principled libertarian perspective. Our popular YouTube Channel and Facebook page, which receive millions of views every month, offer a mix of heavily reported documentaries, in-depth interviews, video essays, and laugh-out-loud parodies—all from a POV that you won't get from legacy media and dead-inside spokesbots for old left-right, liberal-conservative, Democratic-Republican outlets. Founded in 2007 by comedian Drew Carey, Reason TV explores and defends "free minds and free markets" in all aspects of human activity and it’s the nation's leading producer of libertarian video content.

  • Watch

    The 3 Rules of Hate Speech and the First Amendment

    Here are three rules you should know about "Hate Speech" and the First Amendment. This is the second episode of Free Speech Rules, a video series on free speech and the law. Volokh is the co-founder of the Volokh Conspiracy, which is hosted at Reason.com. Written by Eugene Volokh, a First Amendment law professor at UCLA. Produced and edited by Austin Bragg, who is not. This is not legal advice. If this were legal advice, it would be followed by a bill. Please use responsibly.

  • Posted on 19 Feb 2019

    download
  • Watch

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's Green New Deal: A Bizarre Grab-Bag of Terrible Ideas

    Last week, New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Democratic Senator Edward Markey introduced the Green New Deal, a non-binding resolution that would radically overhaul America's economy in the name of fighting global climate change. The resolution bundled together a variety of big-ticket progressive policy priorities, not all of which were obviously related to climate change, from universal health coverage to a jobs guarantee to subsidized college. The proposal was swiftly praised by much of the 2020 Democratic presidential field—yet even some liberals wondered if it was trying to do too much at once. In attempting to be all things to everyone, would the Green New Deal end up being nothing to anyone? Veronique de Rugy, a Reason columnist and a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, joins us to explain what the Green New Deal means, why it would be so expensive, and why even socialist countries in Europe don't try to do this much. Interview by Peter Suderman. Edited by Meredith Bragg, Todd Krainin, and Mark McDaniel. Cameras by Bragg and Krainin. FRACTURES by Ryan Little. Photo Credits: STEVE FERDMAN/UPI/Newscom JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS/Newscom Estelle Ruiz/ZUMA Press/Newscom Alex Edelman/SIPA/Newscom

  • Posted on 14 Feb 2019

    download
  • Watch

    Stossel: A Better School

    3 million kids (mostly boys) are given medication that's supposed to make them sit still and focus. But what if schools, not kids, are the problem? One former public school student, Cade Summers, tells John Stossel that he hated the effect of the drugs--that it was like he had been "lobotomized." Cade's parents took him off the "attention deficit" drugs and sent him to other schools. But Cade hated them all. "I would come home and I would sometimes just cry," Cade tells Stossel. Then he heard of a new type of school in Austin, Texas. It promised to let kids discuss ideas, and to do real-world work. But the school, the Academy of Thought and Industry, is a private school that charges tuition. So Cade started getting up at 3 a.m. to work in a coffee shop to help pay the tuition. What kind of school could possibly be worth that to a kid? The views expressed in this video are solely those of John Stossel; his independent production company, Stossel Productions; and the people he interviews. The claims and opinions set forth in the video and accompanying text are not necessarily those of Reason.

  • Posted on 12 Feb 2019

    download
  • Watch

    Gun Control Is Still Dead: Paloma Heindorff on Homemade Firearms and Defense Distributed After Cody Wilson

    The Austin-based nonprofit Defense Distributed, which defends and facilitiates the homemade firearm movement, has had a wild seven months: It reached a settlement in a longstanding federal lawsuit, it reposted all of its downloadable gun files on the internet, it was sued by 25 states, and then it had to pull all those files back down. It also just launched a new product: the Polymer80 kit for finishing a Glock-style handgun on the company's Ghost Gunner milling machine in about half an hour. But the most consequential event for the company was the arrest and indictment of its charismatic founder, Cody Wilson. In September 2018, Austin police announced a warrant for Wilson's arrest for allegedly paying for sex with a 16-year-old female he met through an app called SugarDaddyMeet—in a state where the age of consent is 17. Police discovered Wilson was in Taiwan, and he was detained and sent home. Wilson is currently out on bail awaiting trial. Stepping up as Defense Distributed's new director was Paloma Heindorff, who had little experience on the public stage and hadn't even fired a gun prior to 2015. So where does Wilson's arrest and resignation leave Defense Distributed, a company oriented around Wilson's brash public persona and vision of all-out war between the state and the individual? And what's the future of its legal battle to protect the First Amendment right to distribute gun files? Reason's Zach Weissmueller went behind the scenes at America's most controversial gun company. Produced by Zach Weissmueller. Camera by Jim Epstein, Mark McDaniel, and Weissmueller. Additional graphics by Epstein. "Dancing on the Edge," by Kai Engel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NC 3.0 license. "Universe in Hands," by Kai Engel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NC 3.0 license. "Aveu," by Kai Engel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NC 3.0 license. "Cendres," by Kai Engel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NC 3.0 license. "Fryeri," by Kai Engel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NC 3.0 license. "Back to Lighted Streets," by Kai Engel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NC 3.0 license.

  • Posted on 08 Feb 2019

    download
  • Watch

    Remy: Better Now?

    Promised an improved way of life, Remy does everything he can to believe in a new ideology–except the math. Post Malone parody written and performed by Remy. Video produced by Austin Bragg. Music tracks and mastering by Ben Karlstrom.

  • Posted on 01 Feb 2019

    download

Follow Playlisto