RoughlyDrafted OUTLOUD: Apple TV, iPod, iPhone, MacAuthor: RDM
23 May 2018

RoughlyDrafted OUTLOUD: Apple TV, iPod, iPhone, Mac

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Commentary on the tech industry by Daniel Eran Dilger in San Francisco. A look at Macs, mobiles, music, and markets with historical context and a future outlook, with more about the iPhone, iPod, and Apple TV than anyone in their right mind could want.

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    RDM OUTLOUD: 15: Origins: Why the iPhone is ARM, and isn't Symbian

    Daniel Eran Dilger
    Windows Mobile, Palm OS, Linux, and Symbian currently power the world’s smartphones. How does each stack up against Apple’s OS X in the iPhone? This article presents an overview and lineage of Symbian. 
     
    Like the Palm OS and Microsoft's WinCE, Symbian also originated out of a software platform designed for PDAs.
     
    However, Symbian has been in development specifically for use in mobile phone devices since 1998; work to adapt the Palm OS and WinCE for use in mobile phones didn't get really going until around 2002, and was largely bolted on the side of platforms that were already of dubious value.
     
    • The Egregious Incompetence of Palm
    • The Spectacular Failure of WinCE and Windows Mobile
     
    Symbian was formed in a partnership between British PDA maker Psion and some the world's largest mobile manufacturers, including Nokia and Ericsson. Symbian's software origins at Psion help to explain why the system is regarded as stable and sophisticated. Psion, EPOC, Acorn, ARM, Newton.

    In AAC, 15 minutes.

    Based on the Article:
    Origins: Why the iPhone is ARM, and isn't Symbian

  • Posted on 18 Aug 2007

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    RDM OUTLOUD: 14: The Egregious Incompetence of Palm

    Daniel Eran Dilger
    Windows Mobile, Palm OS, Linux, and Symbian currently power the world’s smartphones. How does each stack up against Apple’s OS X in the iPhone? This article presents an overview of Palm.
     
    Palm's early products actually followed a trajectory strikingly similar to Apple's original Macintosh. Differences in the choices made at Palm provide an interesting glimpse into "what if" scenarios of a parallel universe.
     
    Here's a look at the decisions that shaped the destiny of the Palm dynasty, and why Palm fell from its position as a dotcom-era darling enjoying a golden age of prosperity to become a modern day CP/M, well past its prime.
     
    The identity of Palm and its OS have changed dramatically over the last decade under the stewardship of various different groups and companies. Palm has been bought up, passed from one company to the next, spun off, split, merged, and regrouped, and the Palm OS has been licensed to independent developers.

    In contrast, WinCE has maintained a steady history within Microsoft under the same management over the last decade, as was previously detailed in The Spectacular Failure of WinCE and Windows Mobile.

    In AAC, 26 minutes.

    Based on the Article:
    The Egregious Incompetence of Palm

  • Posted on 17 Aug 2007

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    RDM OUTLOUD: 13: The Spectacular Failure of WinCE and Windows Mobile

    Daniel Eran Dilger
    Windows Mobile, Palm OS, Linux, and Symbian currently power the world’s smartphones. How does each stack up against Apple’s OS X in the iPhone? Here’s an overview looking at the merits of each, starting with Microsoft.  
     
    WinCE, the operating system behind Microsoft’s Windows Mobile platform, was initially released in late 90s just as Apple was headed toward scuttling its Newton division and Palm OS devices were gaining in popularity.

    WinCE wasn't Microsoft's first attempt at delivering software to power a PDA or pen computing device; once it arrived, it needed to change marketing names rapidly in order to escape embarrassment.

    In AAC, 17 minutes.

    Based on the Article:
    The Spectacular Failure of WinCE and Windows Mobile

  • Posted on 16 Aug 2007

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    RDM OUTLOUD: 12: Newton Lessons for Apple's New Platform

    Daniel Eran Dilger
    Apple’s press releases all end with the phrase “Apple ignited the personal computer revolution in the 1970s with the Apple II and reinvented the personal computer in the 1980s with the Macintosh.” Today, Apple is building a new platform, and applying lessons it learned from the 90s.
     
    During that nearly forgotten epoch of upheaval and crisis, Apple tried to launch the Newton as a new platform, although its subsequent failure in the marketplace didn’t earn it a mention in Apple’s press release blurb.
     
    The Newton wasn’t just a new gadget, it was intended to be a diverse platform. Like the Macintosh from the prior decade, the Newton started as one product, and intended to branch out into a range of systems.

    In AAC, 21 minutes.

    Based on the Article:
    Newton Lessons for Apple's New Platform

  • Posted on 15 Aug 2007

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    RDM OUTLOUD: 11: OS X vs. WinCE: How iPhone Differs from Windows Mobile

    Daniel Eran Dilger
    Apple's announcement at Macworld that the new iPhone would be powered by OS X was a surprise. The middle of last year, I had stated that Apple would likely use Symbian rather than develop a mobile version of Mac OS X. Just prior to Macworld, I predicted no chance for a new Mac or iPod device running "Mac OS X CE." I threw in the “CE” just to be extra safe, as an allusion to Microsoft's problematic money pit of WinCE / Windows Mobile. As it turns out, that detail lets me now insist that I was only half wrong: while Apple did indeed announce a mobile version of its desktop OS, it's not really comparable to Microsoft's WinCE strategy at all.

    In AAC, 10 minutes.

    Based on the Article:
    OS X vs. WinCE: How iPhone Differs from Windows Mobile

  • Posted on 16 Jul 2007

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