SundayAuthor: BBC Radio 4
22 Sep 2018

Sunday

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A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week

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    Religious education, Recovery walks, Moral economy

    As Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing comes to an end, the BBC's White House reporter Tara McKelvey talks to William about his religious background and how it might appeal to the religious conservatives. Should Religious Education be renamed Religion and Worldviews and include non-religious perspectives such as Humanism and atheism? A major commission on RE has urged the Department for Education to do just this. William discusses it's findings with Rev John Hall, Dean of Westminster Abbey and chair of the commission. The Visible Recovery Movement is an alternative to 12 step fellowship programmes for those with addiction. Rosie Dawson went on a recovery walk in Shrewsbury to find out more. Professor Alison Scott-Baumann from SOAS tells William about the biggest research study ever of Muslim students in British universities. As the Archbishop of Canterbury warns of the need for the wealthy to be taxed more, theologian Dr Ian Paul and Andy Walton from the Centre for Theology and Community discuss whether the Archbishop is right. The Chief Rabbi has issued guidance for Orthodox Jewish schools on how to protect and improve the lives of LGBT pupils. Journalist Angela Epstein explains what the guidance entails and reaction to it. Harry Farley continues his series of interviews with politicians about their faith and politics by talking to the Conservative MP Gary Streeter. Producers: Catherine Earlam Peter Everett Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.

  • Posted on 09 Sep 2018

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    The Pope in Ireland - a Sunday Programme Special

    William Crawley presents a special programme from Phoenix Park, Dublin: Pope Francis is in Ireland for the World Meeting of Families. What sort of welcome will Pope Francis receive amid global allegations of abuse in the Catholic Church? Over fifty thousand people are expected, and William Crawley will give a taste of the atmosphere as people flock to Dublin from across Ireland and beyond. He will look at the importance of Pope Francis's visit for Catholics in Ireland and examine how the Church in Ireland has changed since Pope John Paul II visited in 1979; a time when the church had much more influence on society and political life. The Pope will also visit the town of Knock. Rajeev Gupta went along to look at the history of this famous shrine and explore the importance of Pilgrimage. The Archbishop of Armagh, Eamon Martin gives his thoughts on the tensions and problems the Catholic Church is facing in Ireland and where he sees its future.Pope Francis met privately with 8 survivors of clerical and institutional abuse. One of them, a Catholic priest Fr Patrick McCafferty, spoke to the BBC's Callum May. Joining William live throughout the programme are former British Ambassador to the Vatican, Francis Campbell and Dearbhail McDonald, Editor for Independent News and Media. They will discuss the reactions to Pope Francis's visit and its legacy both for the relationship between Church and State and for the wider Society in Ireland now and in the future. Producers Rajeev Gupta Carmel Lonergan Editor Christine Morgan.

  • Posted on 26 Aug 2018

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    Divine Aretha, Faith in Westminster, Pope in Ireland discussion

    We reflect on the deep Christian faith and gospel roots of Aretha Franklin with music, archive and the reflections of biographer David Nathan. American pastor Andrew Brunson is at the heart of a trade war between Turkey and the US. Emily Buchanan talks to Pastor Ryan Keating, who was himself deported from Turkey on charges of being a threat to national security about the place of Christianity in Turkey today. A report at the UN this week claimed that China is holding a million Muslim Uighurs in detention in Xinjiang province. The BBC's China correspondent John Sudworth talks to Emily Buchanan. Carol Monaghan is the SNP MP for Glasgow North West. She talks to Harry Farley about wearing her faith on her sleeve for our series on faith in Westminster. Ahead of the Pope's visit to Ireland a debate is raging over whether the World Meeting of Families is too exclusive and conservative or too liberal and inclusive. Martin Pendergast and Anthony Murphy join the programme to discuss that question. As more and more cases of clerical abuse come to the fore, Emily Buchanan speaks to Mark Stibbe who alleges he was abused by conservative evangelical Christian camp leader John Smyth, who died this week. And Safeguarding expert Donald Findlater discusses why there are so many sex abuse scandals involving clergy. Ben Wood, Chair of the National Association of Teachers of RE, talks to Emily Buchanan about the dramatic drop in RE studies at A Level - why it's declining and what he thinks should be done about it. Editor: Christine Morgan Producers: Catherine Earlam Harry Farley.

  • Posted on 19 Aug 2018

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    Cremations in Bali, Teaching the history of the Middle East, Why wear the burka?

    Hundreds of people have died after a devastating earthquake hit the Indonesian Islands of Lombok and Bali this week. As Hindus on the islands start making preparations for the cremations of loved ones, Maria Bakkalapulo reports on the rituals and the significance of food during the ceremonies. The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) accused two Catholic schools of allowing abuse to go unchecked for 40 years. They say both Ampleforth and Downside have blocked efforts to reform their structures. But how did safeguarding in these schools run by religious orders go so badly wrong. We start our series looking into how MP's with a faith balance religious beliefs and political life. This week Harry Farley meets Labour's Slough MP Tanmanjeet Dhesi at his local Sikh gurdwara. Wim Wenders' docu-film Pope Francis - A Man of His Word is out in the UK this week. Richard Fitzwilliams reviews the film with Emily Buchanan followed by an interview with director Wim Wenders himself. Only 2200 out of 550,000 GCSE history students took up the choice to study Israel-Palestine conflict this year. We talk to Michael Davies, a history teacher in Lancaster who says he has come up with an effective way to teach this topic in schools. Suhayl Patel, curriculum manager at the Abrar Academy faith school also joins us to tell us how Michael's teaching methods allowed pupils at his school to understand the conflict from a Jewish point a view. Why do some Muslim women wear a Burka when others feel a simple headscarf is enough to be compatible with their Islamic values? Mona Siddiqui and Fatima Barkatulla discuss the history and theology behind the Muslim veil. PRODUCERS: RAJEEV GUPTA PETER EVERETT SERIES PRODUCER: AMANDA HANCOCK.

  • Posted on 12 Aug 2018

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    Empire of the Sikhs, Pakistan elections, Consecrated virgins

    Poonam Taneja reports on the Empire of the Sikhs exhibition, a rare collection of stunning objects and works of art that reveal the remarkable story of the Sikh Empire and the European and American adventurers who served it. BBC Religious Affairs Editor Martin Bashir looks ahead to this week's review by the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse (IICSA) of the case of Peter Ball, the former Bishop of Gloucester, who was imprisoned in 2015 for abusing young men. Following the publication of new Vatican guidelines on what it means to be a consecrated virgin, Edward Stourton speaks to Elizabeth Rees who explains what life is like as a consecrated woman. Secunder Kermani reports on the influence of Sufi mystics on the outcome of the upcoming Pakistan elections. Jasvinder Sanghera tells Edward Stourton why her forced marriage campaign group Karma Nirvana is handing out spoons at a school to help tackle the summer holiday spike in forced marriage cases. Following a debate in the House of Lords of a bill calling for civil partnerships to be extended to siblings living together, we hear from one person living in a 'platonic partnership' about why they believe this is a matter of correcting a serious injustice. Do Christians and atheists have more in common than is commonly thought? Krish Kandiah thinks so and says why in his new book Fatheism. He's joined by Andrew Copson, Chief Executive of Humanists UK. to discuss the current climate of conversation between believers and non-believers. Producer Catherine Earlam Louise Clarke-Rowbotham Series Producer Amanda Hancox.

  • Posted on 22 Jul 2018

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