The Ellison Center at the University of WashingtonAuthor: The Ellison Center at the University of Washington
28 May 2017

The Ellison Center at the University of Washington

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The Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington promotes in-depth interdisciplinary study of all major post-communist subregions - Eastern and Central Europe, the Baltic region, the Caucasus and Central Asia, and Russia - in order to understand the legacies of the imperial and communist past as well as to analyze the emerging institutions and identities that will shape Eurasia's future. We share audio of interesting and relevant events hosted by our Center.

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    Robert Bedeski | Roots of the Mongol State: Genghis Khan's Survival and Pragmatism (5.18.2017)

    Robert Bedeski, Affiliate Professor at the Ellison Center for Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies, draws lessons from the life of Genghis Khan that provide insight into how states and societies form. In this lecture, Dr. Bedeski talks about his research and discusses what "The Secret History of the Mongols" can tell us about life and security today. Dr. Bedeski's new book, "Genghis Khan – Sustaining Existence" is available to read via the UW ResearchWorks Archive, located here: https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/38457 Dr. Bedeski is an Adjunct and Emeritus Professor of Political Science at the University of Victoria and an Affiliate Professor at the Jackson School of International Studies.

  • Posted on 22 May 2017

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    Scott Radnitz | Trump and Russia: Putin the Pieces Together (5.3.2017)

    The presidency of Donald Trump has vast implications for international affairs and even the internal politics of other countries — it could lead to geopolitical realignments on a global scale. In response, the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington has launched a class on “Trump in the World: International Implications of the Trump Presidency.” This lecture by Scott Radnitz focuses on Russia. Scott Radnitz is Director of the Ellison Center for Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington.

  • Posted on 09 May 2017

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    William Brumfield | Architecture of the Russian North and Digital Collection Launch (5.6.2017)

    Dr. William Craft Brumfield introduces the William Brumfield Russian Architecture Digital Collection, an online resource available through the UW Library featuring over 29,000 images of Russian sites, mostly buildings constructed from the Middle Ages and the present. To access the William Brumfield Russian Architecture Digital Collection, please visit the following URL: http://content.lib.washington.edu/brumfieldweb/index.html Dr. Brumfield also discusses "Architecture at the End of the Earth," an exhibition of his photographs from the Russian north at the University of Washington. Following Dr. Brumfield, University of Washington professors Christopher Campbell, Elena Campbell, Ivan Drpić, and Ellen Hurst provide remarks about Russian architecture and heritage. Brumfield's exhibit and the event at the University of Washington was recently featured in Russia Beyond the Headlines. To read the article, click here: https://www.rbth.com/special_projects/discovering_russia_1/2017/05/12/russian-architecture-at-the-end-of-the-earth-draws-american-audience_761744 To access the William Brumfield Russian Architecture Digital Collection, please visit the following URL: http://content.lib.washington.edu/brumfieldweb/index.html A professor of Russian literature at Tulane University in New Orleans, William Brumfield is the author of over forty books and hundreds of articles on Russian architectural history and is widely recognized as North America’s foremost expert on the subject.

  • Posted on 08 May 2017

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    Douglas Smith | Rasputin: Faith, Power, and the Twilight of the Romanovs (4.25.2017)

    A hundred years after his murder, Rasputin continues to excite the popular imagination as the personification of evil. Numerous biographies, novels, and films recount his mysterious rise to power as Nicholas and Alexandra's confidant and the guardian of the sickly heir to the Russian throne. But as the prizewinning historian Douglas Smith shows, the true story of Rasputin's life and death has remained shrouded in myth. In this lecture, Smith separates fact from fiction, drawing on his extensive archival research. In his book, "Rasputin: Faith, Power, and the Twilight of the Romanovs," Smith presents Rasputin in all his complexity — man of God, voice of peace, loyal subject, adulterer, drunkard.

  • Posted on 26 Apr 2017

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    Max Bergholz | Violence as a Generative Force: Identity, Nationalism & Memory in a Balkan Community

    During two terrifying days and nights in September 1941, the lives of nearly 2,000 men, women, and children were taken savagely by their neighbors in Kulen Vakuf, a small rural community straddling today's border between northwest Bosnia and Croatia. The frenzy — in which victims were butchered with farm tools, drowned in rivers, and thrown into deep vertical caves — was the culmination of a chain of local massacres that began earlier in the summer. Max Bergholz is Associate Professor of History at Concordia University in Montreal. In this talk, he discusses research from his book, "Violence as a Generative Force" which tells the story of the sudden and perplexing descent into extreme violence of a once peaceful multiethnic community straddling the border between Bosnia and Croatia.

  • Posted on 24 Apr 2017

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