The Ellison Center at the University of WashingtonAuthor: The Ellison Center at the University of Washington
24 Nov 2017

The Ellison Center at the University of Washington

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The Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington promotes in-depth interdisciplinary study of all major post-communist subregions - Eastern and Central Europe, the Baltic region, the Caucasus and Central Asia, and Russia - in order to understand the legacies of the imperial and communist past as well as to analyze the emerging institutions and identities that will shape Eurasia's future. We share audio of interesting and relevant events hosted by our Center.

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    Sarah Chayes | The 21st Century Gilded Age: A Global Trend (10.19.2017)

    Sarah Chayes, a senior fellow in Carnegie’s Democracy and Rule of Law program, discusses how cultural and technological shifts have fueled corruption -- and some explosive reactions to it. She will chart these trends from countries as diverse as Russia, Nigeria and the U.S.

  • Posted on 27 Oct 2017

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    Glennys Young | Putin’s Russia: A Historian’s View (8.9.2017)

    Glennys Young is a Professor in the History Department and the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. In this lecture, Dr. Young considers the question of why the promise of Russia’s democratic transition at the end of Soviet Communism resulted in another form of authoritarian power centered in the person of Vladimir Putin. She looks at several prominent theories, including one she has been working on for an upcoming book, to bring into view the complexity of this question. After putting Putin himself into historical context, Dr. Young critiques how adherents of each theory define the political situation in Russia through how they approach and deal with the Russian and Soviet past. Dr. Young's lecture was part of the Summer 2017 Master Teacher Workshop on “Coming to Terms with the Authoritarian Past in Europe and Russia”at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies. This workshop was organized by UW's Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, the Center for West European Studies, and the Center for Global Studies in partnership with the Word Affairs Council.

  • Posted on 17 Aug 2017

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    James Felak | From the Habsburgs to Hitler and Stalin(8.9.2017)

    James Felak is a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington In "From the Habsburgs to Hitler and Stalin: How the Trauma of World War One Led Hungary into the Axis & Soviet Empires," Dr. Felak discusses how the enormous losses of land and Magyar population suffered by the Kingdom of Hungary due to the post-WWI Treaty of Trianon would shape much of the country's 20th century experience. Possessed by a desire to roll back the Treaty of Trianon's punitive stipulations, Hungary would find common cause with the Axis powers in WWII but eventually wind up behind the Iron Curtain no larger than it had been since the 1920 peace conference at the Grand Trianon Palace in Paris. Dr. Felak's lecture was part of the Summer 2017 Master Teacher Workshop on “Coming to Terms with the Authoritarian Past in Europe and Russia”at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies. This workshop was organized by UW's Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, the Center for West European Studies, and the Center for Global Studies in partnership with the Word Affairs Council.

  • Posted on 16 Aug 2017

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    Lifflander | What's Old is New: The End of the Last Cold War and the Start of a New One (5.25.2017)

    Justin Lifflander moved to Moscow in the fall of 1987 with a degree in Soviet Studies and a desire to become a US intelligence officer. Things didn’t work out as he planned. He tells the story of the warming relations between the super powers – first from the perspective of an embassy driver, then as a missile inspector in the provincial town of Votkinsk. Thirty years later – still in Russia – career and family have given him a broad set of experiences that provide for a unique view of Russia’s relations with the rest of the world. After his weapons inspector role, Lifflander worked as an executive for Hewlett-Packard Russia for twenty years. He then served as the business editor for the Moscow Times from 2010 to 2014 and authored several articles about Russian-American relations.

  • Posted on 01 Jun 2017

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    Russian Human Rights Lawyer Sergey Golubok | Global Mondays Lecture Series (05.12.2017)

    Sergey Golubok is an attorney based in St. Petersburg, Russia. Since 2011, he has been representing parties in cases heard before the Russian courts, including the Supreme Court and the Constitutional Court, and before courts in Belarus, European Court of Human Rights, Committee against Torture, and Human Rights Committee. In addition to representing applicants in the proceedings before the European Court of Human Rights, he also acts for the authors of communications lodged against various States (including Russia, Belarus, and Sri Lanka) with the UN human rights treaty bodies, such as the Human Rights Committee and the Committee against Torture, as well as the special procedures of the UN Human Rights Council. Dr. Golubok writes extensively on topical issues of international human rights law and international criminal law in both English and Russian and comments on legal issues of public significance for leading Russian periodicals and TV channels.

  • Posted on 23 May 2017

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