The Project Management PodcastAuthor: OSP International LLC
17 Oct 2018

The Project Management Podcast

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Project Management for Beginners and Experts. Are you looking to improve your Project Management Skills? Then listen to The Project Management Podcast™, a weekly program that delivers best practices and new developments in the field of project management. The more companies understand the importance of sound Project Management, the more will your skills be in demand. Project Management is the means used by companies today to turn their vision and mission into reality. It is also the driver behind transforming a business need into a business process. The Project Management Podcast™ looks at how project management shapes the business world of today and tomorrow. Find us on the web at http://www.pm-podcast.com or send your emails to info@pm-podcast.com. The Project Management Podcast™ is a trademark of OSP International LLC. All other trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. Copyright © 2005 - 2017 OSP International LLC. All rights reserved.

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    Episode 419: Setting up a PMO in 100 Days (Free) #PMOT

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    Hussain
    Hussain Bandukwala, PMO Coach

    Is your company thinking about setting up a PMO and nobody, not even you, have the experience to do it?

    That is not a problem.

    Our guest today is Hussain Bandukwala (LinkedIn Profile). He is the organizer of the PMO Virtual Summit and PMOs are his passion. He writes and speaks about them. And in one of his articles he says that even if you’ve never done it before you can still set up a PMO in 100 days.

    We discuss how realistic this is, what skills a PMO leader needs, the mindset needed to do this in 100 days, and then we’ll take you phase by phase through the process of setting up your very own PMO in 100 days.

    PDU Tip

    This interview is 44:29 minutes long. This means that you can "legally" only claim 0.50 PDUs for listening to it, because in order to claim 0.75 PDUs the interview must be 45 minutes long. However... if you first listen to the interview and then also read the following article from Hussain about setting up a PMO in 100 days, then you can go ahead and claim 0.75 PDUs!

    Click to read the article

    Episode Transcript

    Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only.

    Podcast Introduction

    Coming Soon

    Above are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Please subscribe to our Premium Podcast to receive a PDF transcript.


  • Posted on 11 Oct 2018

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    PMO Virtual Summit

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  • Posted on 01 Oct 2018

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    Episode 418: Essential Business Management Skills (Free)

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    All presenters
    All interview guests

    Last year at the Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Congress 2017 in Chicago, Illinois I recorded about a dozen interviews. They have all been published over the past year and you've probably heard some or all of them. But what you don't know is what happened once each interview was complete.

    I pressed the recording button one more time and asked each of my guests the following question: What business management skills are essential for today’s project manager if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations?

    And today you are going to get all the answers. In one nice mashup. Here are all the presenters in the order you will hear their answers

    • Andy Kaufmann
    • Betsy Stockdale
    • Laszlo Retfalvi
    • Justin Fraser
    • Jen Pfaff
    • Sarah Gallagher
    • Kim Wasson
    • Darryl Hahn
    • Jeff Kissinger
    • Niraj Kumar

    Oh, and spoiler alert... the answer that I received most often was "Flexibility".

    Episode Transcript

    Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only.

    Podcast Introduction

    Cornelius Fichtner: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we introduce you to the essential business management skills that we project managers need in order to become more strategic.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. This is Episode #418 and I am Cornelius Fichtner. It’s good to have you with us.

    Podcast Interview

    Cornelius Fichtner: Last year at the PMI Global Conference in Chicago, I recorded about a dozen interviews. They have all been published over the past few months and you’ve probably heard some or all of them. But what you don’t know is what happened once each interview was complete because I pressed the recording button one more time and asked each of my guests the following question: “What business management skills are essential for today’s project managers if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations?”

    And today, you are going to get all the answers that I have recorded in one nice mash-up. We begin with Andy Kaufmann who says that assertiveness is one of the keys to success.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Andy, what business management skills are essential for today’s project managers if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations?

    Andy Kaufmann: You know, I had a coaching client who is a director level at the time and he said to me. He goes: “Alright! So this is like summer, mid-year by next Spring. I need to be a Vice President.” And it surprised that he was so focused on title. Because most people maybe it’s more on pay or something else. But he goes: “I got to have that title by then.” So we talked about it that you can’t go in titled, but you can sometimes ask. For example: “I want to get there. What does it take to get there?” And then you have to do it. You can just you know say it.

    By the way, he got it and it wasn’t brilliant coaching. It was that he did the stuff that he had to do. One of the things I find especially for project managers who grow up from individual contributor to maybe some sort of team, some sort of project manager where as they grow up one of the business management skills that is missing is assertiveness. As they get more and more responsibilities, sometimes they become a little bit more ensure of themselves.

    Like I read this thing that said: The biggest fear of CEOs is the impostor syndrome that people will find out that we’re not as good as we think of. And so as they get more and more, sometimes they start pulling back on the assertiveness and if anybody would like some advice on that, there’s this woman named Sarah Robb O’Hagan who wrote a book called “Extreme You” and she is like, here are some ways to ramp up your assertiveness. And too often we think sometimes assertiveness is aggressiveness and it’s different. It’s sometimes being willing to speak up saying: “I want to be on those strategic programs.” What does it take to do that?

    Or speaking up at a meeting. One of the proxies we used for someone’s relation skills is: Do they speak up at meetings? It’s a pretty weak proxy but we use that sometimes. They don’t speak up in meetings. They are probably not a leader which is weak but sometimes that’s a shortcut that we use. So a little bit more speaking up, a little bit more of asking for what you want and advocating for yourself. And there are a lot of great resources to do it but it’s one that I find a lot of project managers don’t do.

    Cornelius Fichtner: And now that you have a new title and you have risen in the ranks, I think that you’ll need a big dose of leadership. So here are Betsy Stockdale and Laszlo Retfalvi.

    So Betsy what business management skills are essential for today’s project manager if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations?

    Betsy Stockdale: For me, that’s leadership. It’s really being able to go through, help identify and understand especially what, where we need to go and the best ways to get there. And using maybe some of our skills in terms of influence to help people understand the variety of different ways that we can get there and accomplish the same goal.

    Cornelius Fichtner: So Laszlo, what business management skills are essential for today’s project managers if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations?

    Laszlo Retfalvi: That’s a very good question. I’ve done a lot of research over the last 20, 30 years including applying practical principles, reviewing PMI’s triangle and I came up with something that is known as a project management leadership model. And it consists of four items, four components --- your ability to have project management expertise. These are the things that distinguish you as a project manager.

    You have core leadership skills. This is where you augment management with leadership. You have what we refer to as a risk-smart attitude. We talked about this a fair amount in today’s session. And then the last one is accountability-based behavior. And this is very important because it’s not being responsible. It’s about being accountable. Combine those and make sure that you are continually improving those elements is what in my opinion sets you apart from that project manager to an outstanding project manager and then you are linked in exactly where you need to be from a strategic perspective and you’ll just be a high-end performer.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Alright! So I asked the total of 10 interview guests to name the business management skill that we project managers need. Of course we are bound to have a few duplicates, but like you’ve just heard even though Betsy and Laszlo both said leadership, they each had their own twist.

    And it’s the same with the next skill. Three of our guests have chosen flexibility but from their own point of view. Here are Justin Fraser, Jen Pfaff and Sarah Gallagher with their thoughts on being flexible.

    So Justin, what business management skills are essential for today’s project manager if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organizations?

    Justin Fraser: Today’s project manager has to be flexible and adaptable to the world that is changing around us. We have new technology. We have apps that help in productivity. We have new ways of doing business and to stay flexible with new ideas is going to allow you to do your projects well and move forward into the strategic thinking for your organization.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Jen, what business management skills are essential for today’s project manager if they want to become more and more involved in strategic projects for their organization?

    Above are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Please subscribe to our Premium Podcast to receive a PDF transcript.


  • Posted on 29 Sep 2018

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    Episode 417: Leading During A Disaster (Free)

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    Niraj and Cornelius
    Niraj Kumar and Cornelius Fichtner

    This interview with Niraj Kumar (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the lively Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2017 in Chicago, Illinois.

    We share insights gained from leading teams in the aftermath of the 2016 flood, called the worst Louisiana disaster since Katrina. Learn how our guest led teams through devastation around them and reacted to a life-altering situation, yet stayed true to the mission to serve the community.

    You will hear how the team leaders collaborated to ensure that the critical tasks get done, operations keep humming, and the affected customers continue to receive service.

    Episode Transcript

    Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only.

    Podcast Introduction

    Niraj Kumar: In this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we look into specific leadership behaviors you can practice to adapt to a chaotic and challenging situation.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I am Cornelius Fichtner.

    Podcast Interview

    Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the lively 2017 PMI Global Conference in Chicago. With me right now is Niraj Kumar. Hello, Niraj!

    Niraj Kumar: Thank you, Cornelius! It’s nice to be able to talk to you again!

    Cornelius Fichtner: Yeah and we finally meet in person, aren’t we?

    Niraj Kumar: Absolutely! It’s so good to see you.

    Cornelius Fichtner: How is the conference going for you so far?

    Niraj Kumar: The conference has been fun. A lot of activities and things that people can take back to their work. It’s definitely very helpful for anybody who is a project practitioner, not just for a project manager but anybody who works with projects. Even for stakeholders, this conference can be very helpful.

    Cornelius Fichtner: You have just finished your presentation a few minutes ago. How was it for you?

    Niraj Kumar: It was great! People participated and I was glad to see the audience’s interests and how they all resonated with the topic and how they can use some of the things we discussed.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Alright! We’ll look into all of that as well.

    Niraj Kumar: Great!

    Cornelius Fichtner: The topic is “Leading During a Disaster: Lessons Learned from the 2016 Louisiana Flood”. What’s the story behind it? What interested you in discussing, presenting this topic here at the Congress?

    Niraj Kumar: I decided to present this topic because when we are in a situation that’s chaotic and disastrous like this event was for our work situation, we go through events, we work with other people, we use some skills, we also learn the limitations of what do we read in books and how we really end up practicing when it comes to leading people, influencing people. And what I do is I put a leadership lens on what took place in this context at work. And I give out some tips and ideas that project practitioners and leaders can use to be more effective in a chaotic situation.

    Cornelius Fichtner: How were you personally affected during this situation?

    Niraj Kumar: I was affected very deeply because as I said before, it’s one thing to read about a flood. It’s one thing to read about a difficult situation or a war situation. It’s one thing to live through a disaster and work through that. I was in the midst of it and I wanted to share what happens when you were in the middle of it. How does it unfold? And how difficult it is to keep people motivated, how difficult it is to get the work done, what should we focus on? And also how some of the things that you read in the news media are very different when you were in the middle of it when you are trying to get your work done?

    At the end of the day, we are professionals. We get paid to hit a target. We get our accolades from working through people and that’s my focus. That’s what we come to work for everyday. I felt like this event the way it changed me from inside, it refined my leadership abilities.

    Before that situation, I was able to lead people. But now after I have gone through that, I would be talking to them differently if I were in a similar situation. So I would say as a team, people who go through the situation, it helps them grow in a certain way. It helps them balance different things including we have to get the work done, but how do we talk to people so they are still motivated. They get the work done, but they also feel good about it at the end of the day.

    Cornelius Fichtner: How did you keep yourself motivated during that time?

    Niraj Kumar: I kept myself motivated by just going through certain steps that I discussed in this presentation. And I believe that to lead others, you first have to lead yourself. You first have to be in the right emotional state, in the right motivational state to be able to accomplish work through others.

    I learned that when you are in a difficult spot and you are struck by a grief, you are struck by any kind of grief, you go through a staged approach. You know we like to call it six stages of grief. And I felt like we, as humans, go through those stages when we are hit by grief and it’s good to know in advance that when we go through a tough situation, first we like to deny it. We like to isolate ourselves from the difficulty and then we like to bargain with universe or with God or with people who we think are the power to be. And at the end of the day, we accept the situation as what it is and then you work from there. So processing grief to me for any individual is an important concept not just in theory but in practice as well.

    I also kept myself motivated because I have a great team. At the end of the day, I believe that your team motivates you and you motivate your team. We are all in a difficult situation together. So having a great team makes a lot of difference. So I would say my ability to really manage my emotions when we go through a tough time and understand that all of us have different ways of managing our emotions and being self-aware about it helps you go through it, helped me go through it better. And also reach out to others and understand that we can help each other out.

    Leadership is a contact sport. I forgot who said it but it’s a very, very true statement. It’s something where you work with others. You know that there is somebody who can step in if you are feeling bad. You know that if you have a team that reports to you or if you are running a project where there are people assigned to your project, if they trust in you and you have done the work to keep and generate the trust, they’ll step up. Even during difficult times, they will do what’s right for you, for your team so those are the things I think about when I think about keeping myself and that applies to anybody if they want to keep themselves motivated.

    Cornelius Fichtner: How do you define leadership?

    Niraj Kumar: I like to define leadership as how and what you do with people, how you think about people, how you talk to them, how you influence through people. So to me, it’s about whatever skills you use to be influencing and working with people, they all combine all these behaviors and thinking and actions, they are leaderships skills for me, and I call them ‘skills’ because they can be learned.

    I believe that just like other skills for a project manager, leadership skills can be learned. Sometimes they take longer than a technical skill takes to learn but I call them ‘skills’ for that reason.

    Cornelius Fichtner: What did your team do during this event?

    Niraj Kumar: My team worked on the tasks that we generally do. My team provides internal support to our largest operational team and what changed for us during this event was how we had to work through some of the tasks that we generally would not work on because of the emergency situations, because our customers needed special processes. They needed different systems or configuration. So we changed those things so we are able to work for our customers and with our government guidelines.

    Cornelius Fichtner: So what are some of the leadership behaviors that you used during this flood in order to keep your team motivated?

    Niraj Kumar: The first thing I do is I’ve always thought the good leaders create followers and great leaders create leaders on their team. And I want to be creating leaders all the time.

    So the first thing that I did or rather I had done before that ended up helping me was I like to empower other people and always thing in terms of who can do my job if I were not here.

    Growing somebody on your team is very, very important to me and there were a few team members who are able to lead the team when I was unable to get to work. So that’s the first thing that I did in advance. I think all the leaders should do, they should develop other leaders. So when they step away, somebody can take their place.

    The other steps that I took is that I think it seems very simple but something that goes a long way is listening to people’s problems when they are in difficult spot. For example, we are at work to get the work done but if people have lost their homes and they want to talk to you about it, they want a sympathetic person to listen to. They want somebody who would say: “I understand you problem. Let’s see..”

    The most important thing is understanding their problem. Putting ourselves in their shoes and not just trying to solve it right away. Being empathetic goes a long way in generating the trust you need in critical time to be able to ask them to do something for you and for the team. So I would say, keep creating leaders on your team. If you a leader today, I would say, become a better listener. Understand that there are times when you just have to lend your ears. You don’t have to solve their problems yet. That time also comes.

    Meet them where they are. If they are hurting, if they lost their lives, if they have no car to go to work, if they have no place to live after they get out of work, if they living at a make-shift arrangement, it’s good to let people know that you understand their problems and you are willing to walk in their shoes. I think once you get that, once you are able to ask them questions, understand the pain they are in, you can work from there. Because then you will ask questions of them differently, you will demand things of them but in the context of the pain that they are working through. That changes how you interact with people. So I think that really helped us in terms of the behaviors and influencing other people.

    I also believe that leadership at the end of the day is also getting stuff done, getting the tasks done. I think one of the things that I recommend project leaders do is they think about what can be done today or tomorrow like in small chunks of time when you are in a disaster or in a chaotic situation. When things are going perfectly well in a project, let’s say you do a communication once a week, you find out what’s wrong maybe once in two weeks, so you have a lot more time to assess the team’s performance, team’s deliverables. In difficult spots like these, you have very little time. You might have to assess the work everyday. You might have to see how are things moving everyday.

    If you are leader, one of the things leaders always have to do very well, one of the first things is they have to set the vision for the team. We have to paint the picture for our team. Tell them where they are going because if we fail to do that, we have failed as a leader. That’s one of the first things we do no matter what the situation.

    In a chaotic situation when people are confused, when things are broken, they don’t know where to go. That skill of setting and communicating vision becomes a lot more important. That means you might have to tell them everyday: ‘Folks, we are going to do XYZ by the end of today.’ Not by the end of a month, not by the end of the year because that’s what they are looking for from you as a leader. They want you to tell them what’s due today and they want you to tell them when you are done. They are done with the work. They want you to tell them that it’s complete I think one of the things that leaders also sometimes lose sight of is that it’s better to talk about a little bit progress, little bit of progress then talk about a lot of work and no progress.

    Let me give you an example, let’s say that in regular project work when things are just going fine and you have all the resources at your disposal, you have all the budget money and there is time available for the project work to be done. Let’s say you have ten tasks that you want your team to accomplish in a day, during chaotic and disastrous situation, you might want to prioritize which three you want to get done not ten because in these situations, you might not have the full capacity. If you had 100 people on your team, you might only have 40 people or 30 people. So you might want to prioritize the work.

    And once you have prioritized the work, the task list to a smaller list, then at that point, you are better off working with the team to get all those three done, completed. Because once they complete the work even though the list is smaller, they will feel more motivated. They will feel more accomplished. They will go home happy and that can give them a reason and a motivation to keep working through the tough situation.

    So you want to give about progress and completion of tasks and not do like: “Let’s do everything” because when you try to do everything, nothing gets done in those situations. And not only it affects your task and the projects, it affects their motivation because motivation is tied to the progress we make. They need to know what progress they made that day and that’s how you want to communicate to your team.

    Cornelius Fichtner: But this is true not only in situations where you have disasters going on around you. This is true in everyday project management.

    Niraj Kumar: Absolutely! The fundamental concept that the people look for progress and complacent is important no matter what situation you are at. The same concept becomes more important for you because to take advantage of that concept and use that to get the work done and keep things motivated, you might have to reconfigure the task and that’s what the trick is during disastrous, during chaotic situations.

    Give the team the clarity they need. In regular situations, you might tell them here are the ten tasks and I’ll talk to you after two weeks. If they are self-motivated professional, they will keep working on it. In chaotic situations, you might have to tell them that this is the one task that needs to be done today. And let’s talk tomorrow and see how we are doing. That’s the difference. You change the frequency and you change the number of tasks and when you can kind of check in with the team and kind of assess how things are going.

    So what changes here in terms of the game, what changes here is that you might have to do a lot more work in assessment and motivation than you are used to. In regular situations, the frequency doesn’t have to be that often. In disastrous situation, you have to stay close to them and watch them more often.

    Cornelius Fichtner: You mentioned that there is a process grief that happens in chaotic situations like this that some of your team members, that their homes were destroyed during this, were you able to provide anything to them to help them through this time? Did your company support you in this in any way?

    Above are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Please subscribe to our Premium Podcast to receive a PDF transcript.


  • Posted on 11 Aug 2018

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    Episode 416: How Millennial Project Managers get Results without Authority (Free)

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    Justin and Cornelius
    Justin Fraser and Cornelius Fichtner

    For the last several years, there has been a focus on helping senior people in the workplace connect with and manage the newest generation in the workforce. Millennials.

    However, this new generation is now moving from entry-level to management positions. Additionally, this is frequently happening within a workplace’s evolving environment and culture. And so both generations need to adapt to each other’s styles, work ethics, and perspectives.

    This interview with Justin Fraser (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded at the impressive Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2017 in Chicago, Illinois.

    In the interview, we dive into the emerging relationship dynamic in which Millennial project managers lead senior team members.

    We identify differences in style, work ethic, and perspective between team members of different generations, seniority, and experience, and discuss various project management approaches to lead team members to a successful project.

    Episode Transcript

    Below are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only.

    Podcast Introduction

    Justin Fraser: On this episode of The Project Management Podcast™, we identify differences in style, work ethic and perspective between team members of different generations, seniority and experience.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Hello and welcome to The Project Management Podcast™ at www.pm-podcast.com. I am Cornelius Fichtner.

    Podcast Interview

    Cornelius Fichtner: We are coming to you live from the impressive 2017 PMI Global Conference in Chicago. And with me right now is Justin Fraser. Good morning, Justin!

    Justin Fraser: Good morning! Thanks for having me. I’m really excited to be here and speak to you this morning and you got my name right, which is fantastic. Most people say something in relation…

    Cornelius Fichtner: We had a small mix up before we started the interview with my questions. I pulled out the questions for a different interview.

    Justin Fraser: No problem!

    Cornelius Fichtner: At least I got the name right. That’s a good one!

    Justin Fraser: Nailed it!

    Cornelius Fichtner: Is this your first congress?

    Justin Fraser: This is my third time attending a congress. This is my first time presenting.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Wow! So comparing it to the previous ones, what’s the energy like this year?

    Justin Fraser: I think the energy’s great! Actually every year the energy is always great. It’s a bit colder here in Chicago than in the last two years in Florida and San Diego, but this year has been fantastic. Lots of great, great talks and the keynotes are motivating and exciting. I sense some really good energy from a lot of people here.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Right. Your topic is about millennials and how we are getting results without formal authority. But let me bring this back to the congress. You’re a millennial. You’re the younger generation. What brings you back here? What has the congress that it offers to you as a millennial that you say: I need to go there. This is important.

    Justin Fraser: Yeah! So I’m only project manager in my company right now and this is something that is important to me because I need to see what others are doing in the industry and in the world. You know you can only take it so far with… Podcast like yours are great to learn a new tip here and there but getting face to face and hearing the talks, networking with folks at breakfast, lunch and dinner and all the other opportunities that are provided here really gives me an opportunity to talk about the challenges that I face and connect with people I have very similar challenges and build relationships with folks that can help me out even when I go back to my office and leave the congress.

    Cornelius Fichtner: So the topic of your presentation is “Millennial Project Managers – Getting Results Without Formal Authority”. What’s the backstory here? What interested you? What prompted you? Why this topic?

    Justin Fraser: So I started managing projects I was 20 years old. I was actually still in college. I went to Drexel University and they have an amazing program where you can go to school full time for 6 months and then you go work full time for 6 months. So I started out doing project management. I was thrown into projects with clients, deliverables, timelines and I was 20 years old. I didn’t even have a degree at that time.

    So there are a lot of challenges that I had connecting with folks that when they met me, they said: “Oh, I’ve been doing this. I’ve been managing this project or this product longer than you have been alive.” “Oh, my son is your age.” Or “My kids are older than you”. You know those are some things that I would hear over and over and over again.

    I think it’s an interesting topic because now I’ve been doing this for 8 or 9 years, I see other project managers coming in that that have the same kind of struggle so I wanted to get the word out and talk to some people about some strategies for connecting with people so that you can still get your work done and you can work with someone who has, it doesn’t matter how many more years of experience they have than you but you can still manage them in a way that will result in a successful project.

    Cornelius Fichtner: Let’s take a step back. What is a millennial?

    Justin Fraser: Ah, millennial is going to be someone who was born 1984 to maybe about 2000. So sort of the younger generation, maybe 32 to 18 or 20, somewhere around there. We tend to have different outlook on life than as any generation does.

    You know you have right now in the workforce mostly Baby Boom generation then the Gen X sort of in the middle and now millennials. And coming up in the next few years, we are going to have Generation Z who are, they are about kids that are 18 or so, graduating high school right now heading into college and they are going to be entering the workforce real soon. And every generation has different styles, communication styles. They have different expectations on work-life balance, flexibility and just the way that they approach life and work in general.

    So the common thread between all of those generations is you have to be able to communicate. My goal with this talk and in my day-to-day life is to figure out how to communicate, how to emphasize with someone who’s maybe just graduating high school or college or someone that has been around for 30 to 40 years doing their job.

    Cornelius Fichtner: So we started out with the Baby Boomers, mid-60’s, that’s when that ends. I’m just at the tail end there. Generation X, 65 to 83. Millennials, 84 to 2000. Generation Z or for our international listeners, Generation Zed, starting at about 2000. Which of these other generations understands millennials best, other than millennials obviously?

     

    Above are the first few pages of the transcript. The complete transcript is available to Premium subscribers only. Please subscribe to our Premium Podcast to receive a PDF transcript.


  • Posted on 21 Jul 2018

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