Upaya Zen CenterAuthor: Joan Halifax | Zen Buddhist Teacher Upaya Abbot
21 Jan 2017

Upaya Zen Center

A Santa Fe, NM Zen center and community with retreats, daily meditation, weekly Dharma talks on Buddhist teachings

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    Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: A Mind Gentle and Forbearing

    Episode Description: Sensei Joshin Byrnes begins by thanking the sangha for its support during the time that he and Sensei Genzan Quennell were preparing to receive Dharma Transmission from Roshi Joan. He then discusses the “power of the robe,” first by acknowledging the negative aspects of religious authority. He then turns his attention to “the all encompassing robe of liberation.” Rather than a piece of cloth, this refers to “a mind that is gentle and forbearing,” which is “the robe we wear both individually and collectively in our lives.” Sensei Genzan asks himself “how did I get here?” He speaks about the various debts of gratitude he owes, particularly to the women in his life that lead him to the dharma. The Senseis invite the sangha to join the residents at the Santa Fe Women’s March, which will take place the day after the presidential inauguration. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

  • Posted on 16 Jan 2017

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    Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: The Whole of the Spiritual Life

    Episode Description: Joshin Brian Byrnes and Genzan Quennell discuss the nature of friendship. Joshin begins by exploring the distinction that constitutes “spiritual” friendship. “Sometimes we offer our friends diamonds,” he says, “and sometimes we offer our friends lotuses.” He then shares an account of a conversation between Ananda and the Buddha, in which the Buddha tells his attendant that “the whole of the spiritual life is about friendship.” Genzan lists seven qualities which a worthwhile friend embodies. He also discusses his spiritual friendship with Joshin, and shares a teaching from Sesame Street. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

  • Posted on 09 Jan 2017

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    Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: Silent Illumination 2016 (Part 2 of 2)

    Episode Description: Genzan Quennell shares a story about a walk that the Hindu god Indra took with the Buddha.  His takeaway from the story is that “we can cease wandering at any moment and find refuge.”  In order to do this, we have to let go of our ideas: “When we are completely empty-handed, then we can see the abundance.”  Joshin Byrnes contemplates how much of our lives are spent crossing thresholds, going from place to place.  “We look far and wide for the answer,” he says, “and sometimes it is much, much closer than we think.”  He then shares a parable about a young student and his search for the “true monastery.” To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. For Series Description please visit Part 1 of 2.

  • Posted on 02 Jan 2017

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    Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: Silent Illumination 2016 (Part 1 of 2)

    Series Description: In this pair of talks, Joshin Brian Byrnes and Genzan Quennell explore the themes of the text Cultivating the Boundless Field. In the context of a sesshin, we are able to go deeper into the text and actualize the field of practice that Honghzhi's text describes. Episode Description: Joshin Brian Byrnes tells us that each day of sesshin brings a "new flavor." He remarks on an error that was made the day prior during a meal, and wonders how we can be nourished by everything we encounter in the course of our practice--even by an empty bowl. The answer that Hongzu provides is that we should bring the qualities of wonder and wandering to everything that we encounter. Genzan Quennell remarks on changes that Buddhism has encountered, such as creation of the monastery system in China and its incorporation into Western culture through the Beat generation.  He quotes Muso Soseki, "When there is no place you have decided to call your own, then no matter where you are, you are always home." To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Click here for Part 2 of 2.

  • Posted on 26 Dec 2016

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    John Dunne: Bodhidharma Through Himalayan Eyes (Part 8 – last)

    Episode Description: John Dunne introduces a practice which he refers to as "the great equanimity." All things "taste the same," he tells us, and he recommends experimenting in moments when we are receiving either praise or blame. He also talks about Jon Kabat-Zinn's work with individuals suffering from chronic pain, which worked to change the patient's relationship to pain, rather than trying to eliminate pain itself. We can view our own pain this way, and accept that while we aren't going to get rid of it, we can eliminate the dualistic grasping which magnifies our suffering. Finally, he introduces a Shamatha practice in which the practitioner uses her own awareness as the object of meditation. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. To access the entire series, please click on the link below: Bodhidharma Through Himalayan Eyes Series For Series description, please visit Part 1.

  • Posted on 26 Dec 2016

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