Upaya Zen CenterAuthor: Joan Halifax | Zen Buddhist Teacher Upaya Abbot
25 Feb 2017

Upaya Zen Center

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A Santa Fe, NM Zen center and community with retreats, daily meditation, weekly Dharma talks on Buddhist teachings

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    Joan Halifax: Exploring Questions on Love and Compassion

    Episode Description: Roshi Joan Halifax begins the talk with an arresting statement: “Our world is burning.” She recounts her recent travels, and a talk she gave at a children’s hospital.  Roshi quotes Rilke, “Love and death are the great gifts that are given to us; mostly they are passed on unopened.” Our work is to open those gifts, she tells us. She also shares from her recent visit with her teacher, Roshi Bernie Glassman, and his answer to the question, “What is love?” "If someone is thirsty, find them something to drink.” She says, “Awakening is based on passion for the world: to serve the world, to meet the world completely, to end suffering in every way possible.” She ends by reading the invocation she has prepared to give next week at the New Mexico House of Representatives. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

  • Posted on 20 Feb 2017

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    John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 5B – last)

    Episode Description: (This part is a continuation from Part 5A) John Dunne talks about how our apprehensions of objects in the world are ultimately non-dual, even though duality is encoded into our day to day experience. He also covers the concept of extended cognition, which tells us that we are not autonomous beings with our own distinct ideas. “Changing our minds and the world has to be a communal enterprise,” he says. There is also discussion of structural violence, which Dunne posits is unintentional discrimination against minorities.  Understanding that people who act unskillfully are deluded, rather than evil, is an important aspect of compassion. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. For Series description, please visit Part 1. To access the entire series, please click on the link below: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

  • Posted on 20 Feb 2017

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    John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 5A)

    Episode Description: John Dunne talks about how our apprehensions of objects in the world are ultimately non-dual, even though duality is encoded into our day to day experience. He also covers the concept of extended cognition, which tells us that we are not autonomous beings with our own distinct ideas. “Changing our minds and the world has to be a communal enterprise,” he says. There is also discussion of structural violence, which Dunne posits is unintentional discrimination against minorities.  Understanding that people who act unskillfully are deluded, rather than evil, is an important aspect of compassion. This session concludes in Part 5B. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. For Series description, please visit Part 1. To access the entire series, please click on the link below: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

  • Posted on 20 Feb 2017

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    John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 4)

    Episode Description: John Dunne gives some advice to the program participants on practicing between sessions. He advises them to try to notice the concepts and beliefs they are carrying with them, and how these influence their interactions and relationships. “What are my hopes and fears?” He implores us to ask ourselves. Dunne addresses the concern that the mindfulness movement may be leading Western Buddhism to become an “opiate of the elite.” He also tells a story as told to him by Bob Thurman about the nature of samsara. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. For Series description, please visit Part 1. To access the entire series, please click on the link below: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

  • Posted on 20 Feb 2017

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    John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 3B)

    Episode Description: (This part is a continuation from Part 3A) John Dunne takes the audience through the “neither one nor many” argument employed in Tibetan Buddhism, which deals with abstraction. How is it that we decide an object we see fits the category “cup,” for example? We try to create “one” ideal, such as “cup,” from the sensory data presented to us that represents many cups. Dunne discusses how this is sometimes problematic, because we have to suppress the differences we see in order to fit things in to categories. Nonetheless, we need this capacity to function in the world, and Dunne discusses the role that intersubjectivity (the concepts we all share) plays in our lives. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. For Series description, please visit Part 1. To access the entire series, please click on the link below: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

  • Posted on 19 Feb 2017

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